7 Can’t Miss Events at the 10th Annual Grand Haven Salmon Festival

The Grand Haven Salmon Festival is celebrating its 10th anniversary September 13-15, 2013 with a weekend full of activities that pay tribute to the area’s bountiful waterways as a natural resource, while coinciding with the region’s annual Salmon migration.

Below, Stefanie Herder of the Grand Haven Area Convention & Visitors Bureau highlights seven can’t miss events happening at this year’s festival. She also shares some festival tips so you can get the most out of your experience at the annual event.

Will you be at the Grand Haven Salmon Festival this weekend? Share with us in the comments section below!

Salmon Festival Fish Boil. Photo credit: Brian Fett.

1)    Friday Night Fish Boil
The Fish Boil is the kick-off event of the festival and is one of the crowd favorite from kids to Grandmas and Grandpas. The Grand Haven Sons of the American Legion are the chefs for the evening, cooking up their secret recipe of boiled salmon and accompaniments. Think tender, juicy salmon served with boiled potatoes, onions, and corn on the cob all covered in melted butter. Ah-Maze-Ing!

Festival Tip: Get your tickets in advance and arrive early. This is a popular event.

2)    Big King Fishing Contest
Before sunrise on Saturday, anglers head out to Lake Michigan in hopes of landing the largest King Salmon of the day with a chance at winning their share of the $2,500 in cash prizes. With local reports of monster salmon in the 25-30lb range, it’s sure to be a BIG year for the tournament.

Photo credit: Ed Post.

Festival Tip: Check out the Big King Weigh-In and awards ceremony around 1:30pm at Waterfront Stadium. If you haven’t seen a Lake Michigan salmon up close before, you won’t believe just how big they can get!

3)    KidZone
This free event on Saturday is chock-full of environmental and educational activities for the kiddos. Here they can have all sorts of fishy-fun by having their face painted, making cute crafts, playing games, and much more. Get up-close and personal with Michigan wildlife, including snakes, turtles, and birds. See live Michigan butterflies inside the Butterfly Tent. Kids can even catch their very own fish at the fishing pond. Again – it’s all free!

Festival Tip: Keep your eyes open for Smokey Bear who will be at this year’s event. It’s a great photo op for the whole family!

4)    Salmon Cook-Off & Wine/Beer Tasting
This premiere event takes place Saturday afternoon under a bright white tents along the Grand Haven harbor. Arrive hungry because you have the opportunity to taste specialty salmon dishes from local eateries. Every year we’re amazed with the creativity of the cook-off contestants who have produced dishes including salmon sushi, salmon sliders, salmon brats and even salmon poppers – salmon stuffed jalapenos wrapped in bacon. Who knows what the chefs will come up with this year, but we can’t wait to try them all! Over 50 Michigan wines and microbrews are available to sip and taste including wines from Chateau Chantel, St. Julian, and Fenn Valley wineries.

Photo credit: Brian Fett.

Festival Tip: Just like the Fish Boil, this is a popular event. Purchase your tickets in advance to save time and money. Advance ticket holders get to use the Fast Track entrance and skip the line. Kind of like a foodie amusement park.

5)    Purple Romp Grape Stomp
Grape stomping. Pretty much everyone has always wanted to try this. The Purple Romp Grape Stomp takes place during the Salmon/Wine Tasting event and is always a blast for participants and spectators. In this bracket style tournament, Romp Stompers face-off to become the Ultimate Grape Stomp champion.

Festival Tip: Get to the Salmon/Wine Tasting event early for a chance to get entered into the competition. Competitors are highly encouraged to come dressed in their best Stomp “uniform.”  

6)    Fall Harvest Entertainment Tent
Even after a full day of festival fun, there is still plenty to celebrate at the Fall Harvest Entertainment Tent on Saturday evening. Soul’d Out, a local favorite band, will be playing a variety of music including Rock, Jazz, Blues, and Funk. Don’t forget to bring your party pants because you are sure to dance all the way until the stroke of midnight.

Festival Tip: The infamous “King” Salmon and his Royal Court have always made their annual appearance at the Entertainment Tent. This is another fun photo op as you can imagine. 

7)    Geocaching Event
Sunday afternoon you can search for hidden treasures during the 2nd annual Salmon Festival Geocaching Event. All you need is a GPS or a smart phone with the Geocaching app, the special event cache coordinates, and you’re ready go. Teams of all sizes and ages are welcome to participate and everyone has a chance to win great prizes.

Festival Tip: If you haven’t tried geocaching before, sign-up for a free account at Geocaching.com and practice finding a few caches near you before the event. There are currently over 1,000 caches hidden all around the Grand Haven area.

Fun festival fact: As part of the Salmon Festival’s journey towards sustainability, the event uses all compostable and recycled products. In 2012, the event was able to reduce their total waste by over 50% compared to 2011’s festival. Almost 60% of last year’s total waste was either composted or recycled instead of going to the landfill. We have our goals set even higher for this year!

We hope you are able to be our guests at the 10th Anniversary of the Grand Haven Salmon Festival!

Stefanie Herder is the Customer Service Coordinator for the Grand Haven Area Convention & Visitors Bureau – The Grand Haven CVB has planned the Grand Haven Salmon Festival for the past 9 years. Stefanie was born and raised in the Grand Haven area and graduated from Grand Valley State University with a degree in Hospitality & Tourism Management. Stefanie and her husband, Josh, enjoy taking full advantage of four seasons of fun Pure Michigan has to offer including golf, kayaking, camping, snowboarding, and yes – fishing & wine tasting. 

Detroit Jazz Festival Brings Amazing Music, Fireworks to the Heart of Downtown Detroit

Detroit may be known for Motown, but each Labor Day weekend for the past 34 years the sounds of world-class jazz takes over Downtown Detroit. Today, Chris Collins, artistic director for the Detroit Jazz Festival fills us in on what’s in store for the four-day festival that starts Friday.

Q: Can you tell us more about the Detroit Jazz Festival and your role?

A: The Detroit Jazz Festival is a really a cultural tour-de-force for Detroit region and throughout the jazz world. It’s the world’s largest free jazz festival and was recently voted by JazzTimes magazine readers as the one of the top two festivals in North America. Every Labor Day for 34 years running, this festival has brought some of the greats of this true American art form to the heart of Detroit for four days of music on four stages, three in Hart Plaza and one in Campus Martius. The festival attracts more than 100,000 people over four days and nearly 25 percent are from out of state, and we have an economic impact in the tens of millions, so it’s a cultural and economic driver for Southeast Michigan

While the festival weekend is our most visible event, many people don’t realize that the Detroit Jazz Festival is a year-round happening. We have events throughout the year such as a Duke Ellington tribute with saxophonist James Carter, a Detroit native, at the Fillmore last March; our Detroit Divas Sing Sing Sing event annually at the Edsel and Eleanor Ford House in Grosse Pointe which is tonight, Aug. 23; and then our Nov. 2 event at Orchestra Hall featuring world-renown saxophonist Wayne Shorter, with Grammy-winner Esperanza Spalding, and the DSO. These are events that are designed to keep the spirit of the festival prevalent throughout the year.

Q: What can visitors expect at this year’s festival?

A: So this year once again, we have a world-class lineup. Opening night is the Macy Gray with the David Murray Big Band and the Danilo Pérez Panama 500. On Sat., Sun. and Mon. we go from around noon until 11 p.m. Saturday headliners are McCoy Tyner and the Sax Summit with Joe Lovano, Dave Liebman and Ravi Coltrane; Sunday is Ahmad Jamal and John Scofield Überjam and Monday is “MILES SMILES“ featuring Wallace Roney, Larry Coryell, Rick Margitza, Ralphe Armstrong, and Alphonse Mouzon, and Joshua Redman Quartet. In addition we have 250-plus local musicians playing including high school and college bands. So, there’s a little something for everyone including late-night jam sessions at the Marriott at the Renaissance Center from 11 p.m. until the wee hours. Beyond the music, there’s great food and art and on Saturday and Sunday nights, we have fireworks on the Detroit River after the last performance. All in all, there are a slew of great activities.

Q: Are there any “can’t miss” performances this year?

A: Well, again, the headliners are out of this world. To put it in context, these are people you would pay hundreds of dollars to see at say, Lincoln Center in New York City. So these are must-dos. But, this year one of the focuses of the festival is one-of-a-kind tributes that you can’t see anywhere else like a Teddy Harris, Jr. tribute by the New Breed Be Bop Society, a tribute to Stan Kenton featuring The Four Freshmen and the Toledo Jazz Orchestra and the four-performance Detroit Jazz Festival Tribute to the late, great Dave Brubeck featuring the Brubeck Brothers.

Q: Do you have any suggestions for other things to see and do while visitors are in town for the festival?

A: Well, Detroit is really so alive right now. Opportunity Detroit is a new sponsor and we couldn’t be happier because our mission and theirs align – and that is to continue to make Detroit a city of promise. So, our festival has a full-days’ worth of wonderful music, but outside there are many other things to do. We often tell people that they can’t go wrong by spending a morning at Eastern Market, or heading over to the Motown Museum or the Detroit Institute of Arts. For those that want more flavor for the neighborhoods of Detroit, Corktown has a slew of interesting restaurants, refurbished houses and a funky vibe that resonates. And, of course because of my role as director of Jazz Studies at Wayne State University, I would be remiss not to mention all the Cultural Center and university areas have much to offer.

Q: Where can people go to learn more about the festival?

A: The best place is the web site at www.detroitjazzfest.com, where you can find complete schedules, maps and details on all the activities.

Learn more about the Detroit Jazz Festival and other happenings around the state on michigan.org. Let us know if you’ll be attending the festival in the comments below!

In addition to being the artistic director of the Detroit Jazz Festival, Chris Collins is a professional jazz woodwind player, and professor and director of jazz studies at Wayne State University (WSU) in Detroit. Collins has been involved with the Detroit Jazz Festival, first as a student and then as a Detroit artist, for 30 years. Originally from Detroit, he began playing the saxophone and clarinet at the age of 10. In addition to his solo career, Collins has played professionally with artists including the Phil Collins Big Band, Doc Severinsen, Mel Torme, Michael Feinstein, Lou Rawls and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Six Things to See at the Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair

The Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair is happening next weekend, August 30 – September 2 at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi. Today, Blair Bowman, proprietor of the venue, fills us in on what makes this event one you don’t want to miss.

There is a powerful groundswell of strong “can-do” attitude that has been growing across Michigan these past few years, as a community we are being compelled to re-think many old ideas about the way our missions are accomplished. We believe that the Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair is a prime example of this paradigm shift. The original Michigan State Fair was one of the state’s most venerable traditions and public sector events, since 1905—but in recent years it had struggled financially and was eventually discontinued.

At nearly the exact same time, however, a new grass-roots movement toward–and interest in–the great natural resources, agriculture, cottage industry food and beverages, farm-to-table produce and similar endeavors has been dawning across the state. As many old career paths have shifted or ended, waves of new businesses are being born here. The new Michigan State Fair is now being produced as a private sector event at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi, with title sponsor Fifth Third Bank, with no state funding involved. The Fair’s aim is to celebrate and encourage the fresh new direction of the Michigan Agriculture Industry, while also maintaining the beloved traditions of our grand old State Fair.

Here are six things you don’t want to miss:

  • Live entertainment at the Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair features talented Michigan sons Marshall Crenshaw, George Bedard and Stewart Francke, as well as a full schedule of entertainers hailing from all across the state.
  • The Shrine Circus at the State Fair, presented by Bright House Networks, features the most famous circus family in the world, the Flying Wallendas!
  • The 2013 Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair will feature a farmers’ market offering locally grown produce for the first time.
  • The State Fair Beer Garden will be pouring Griffin Claw of Birmingham, Vander Mill Cider of Spring Lake, Kuhnhenn Brewing Company and Dragon Mead from Warren and North Peak Brewing Company of Traverse City, courtesy of Powers Distributing.
  • The 2013 Fair will offer more carnival rides in the newly expanded Arnold Amusements Midway, presented by Wal-Mart.
  • One of the most popular, longtime attractions of the Michigan State Fair has been the Butter Cow, a feat of dairy sculpture like no other! The 2013 Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair is very pleased to welcome the return of the Butter Cow, created by Mr. Tom Paul Fitzgerald, of Almont, retired instructor of art sculpting from Wayne State University. Mr. Fitzgerald was the sculptor of the Butter Cow for 18 previous years at the Michigan State Fair.

The Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair has also announced that in collaboration with the Detroit Shriners and the Metropolitan Detroit Convention & Visitors Bureau, the Fair will award $10, 000 in educational scholarship funds to deserving youth in cities across the state. The Urban Youth Agriculture Scholarship Program is aimed at increasing involvement and awareness of youth agriculture programs, and to promote farming, agriculture, and livestock management within the great state of Michigan. Details of all the Fair scholarship programs and applications are available on the Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair website.

Read more about the Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair on michigan.org and let us know if you’ll be there!

Blair Bowman is the proprietor of the Suburban Collection Showplace, Diamond Conference Center and brand new Hyatt Place Hotel on Grand River Avenue in Novi, Michigan.