10 Fun Facts About The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation

On Oct. 1, The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation marks its third season as part of the CBS Dream Team line-up. As we gear up for another year of Mo Rocca, dreaming big, unique stories from The Henry Ford’s Archive of American Innovation and the stories from innovators across the globe, here are a few facts you may not know about the show:

1. Filming for all The Henry Ford segments actually takes place over the course of three weeks. The film crew typically comes in for a week in July, September and December and can film anywhere between 7-8 episodes each week.

2. Do you want to see some TV magic being made? Then make sure you connect with The Henry Ford’s social media channels for updates on the next filming dates. Guests are welcome to watch the behind-the-scenes action, and you never know, you might even get to meet show host Mo Rocca.

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

3. The show gives guests both old and new the chance to see and learn more about the great items inside The Henry Ford’s collection. With 26 million artifacts, there’s sure to be one that even the most dedicated of Henry Ford fans, might say “hey, I didn’t know they had that!” This season, the show definitely does just that – highlighting some of our more familiar items like Henry Ford’s 1896 Quadricycle and our 1913 Herschel-Spillman carousel located in Greenfield Village to the unique items that may not be so recognizable, including the collection of Susana Allen Hunter quilts and telecommunications items from Charles Jenkins

4. Not only does The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation provide a closer look at The Henry Ford’s collection, but the show provides insight that labels aren’t big enough to display. Each segment includes an in-depth interview with our curators that are actually filmed twice – once with the producers and then again with show host Mo Rocca. Guests interested in diving even deeper into story topics can visit thehenryford.org for a look at related archive items, photos, videos, blog posts and more inside our episode guides.

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

5. The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation has beat-out big names like Ellen and Oprah for Emmys! During its two years of award contention, the show has been nominated for six Daytime Emmys and has won two. In its first year, it took home the Emmy for Outstanding Special Class Series and in 2016 won the Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Writing Special Class.

6. Emmys aren’t the only awards the show has won. The show has received two Parents’ Choice Silver Recommendations, one Cynopsis Media Social Good Award for Integrated Campaign for a TV Series and five Telly Awards.

7. Show host Mo Rocca has been able to do some pretty cool things at The Henry Ford in the three seasons of filming. He’s helped shear our Merino Sheep at Firestone Farm, driven our 1922 Detroit Electric inside Henry Ford Museum, helped out our conservation textile department, and this season will ride inside Henry Ford’s first automobile – the 1896 Quadricycle.

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

8. The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation has an awards program that educators can enter. The Teacher Innovator Awards recognizes America’s most innovative teachers.  This past year’s winners received an Innovation Immersion Experience at The Henry Ford including round-trip airfare, accommodations, behind-the-scenes tours with our curators and a special recognition ceremony.

9. The first season of the show is actually available on DVD! You can purchase The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation on our website www.thehenryford.org or inside one of our campus retail stores.

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

Photo Courtesy of The Henry Ford

10. This isn’t the first time we’ve hosted our own TV show. In the 1950s Marion Corwell hosted “Windows to the Past,” a history-based program for children on Detroit Public Television. Throughout the years The Henry Ford has been the backdrop for live broadcasts, interviews and even dramatic television cameos.

For more information on The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation visit www.thehenryford.org. Interested in tuning in? Check your local listings here to find out when “The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation” is playing in your area.

Meet the Blogger:

melissa-foster

 

Melissa Foster is the Media and Film Relations Manager at The Henry Ford. Melissa is front and center on the TV show filming action as a part of the show’s crew.

Three Fantastic Fall Scenic Drives in Pure Michigan

Michigan’s motto is, “If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look about you.” In this day and age, it can also be interpreted as, “If you seek a pleasant drive, pick a road near you.” With 111 designated Natural Beauty Roads, 20 National Byways and more than 212 miles of twists, turns and celebrated scenery, Michigan is abundant in breathtaking drives, especially when the countryside is ablaze with fall foliage fireworks.

Combining the convenience of cruising with accessibility to awesome adventures, many Michiganders prefer to meander through majestic Michigan from the comfort of an RV. Beginning with Henry Ford and the Vagabonds “glamping” vacations 100 years ago, the idea of traveling with civilized accoutrements has not gone out of style and has, instead, expanded into the RV and camping industry of today.

From waterfalls to gorges, coastlines to farmer stands bursting with Pure Michigan autumn abundance, fall is an absolutely stunning time to take a comfortable cruise through foliage in full splendor. During an autumn trip, chances are you’ll experience less-crowded conditions at campgrounds, RV parks, restaurants and attractions.

Some favorite fall scenic drives that represent the bounty and beauty of Pure Michigan include:

1. West Michigan Pike
Hugging the curves of Lake Michigan from Chicago, Ill., to Mackinaw City, this 500-mile road has been “Lake shore all the way” since 1915. Passing through vacation destination villages like Holland, Manistee and Sleeping Bear Dunes, this roadway is an RV travelers dream with multiple campgrounds and RV parks located just off the beaten path.

Photo Courtesy of the Michigan Association of Recreation Vehicles and Campgrounds (MARVAC)

Photo Courtesy of the Michigan Association of Recreation Vehicles and Campgrounds (MARVAC)

2. Historic Motor Tour US 27
“Back in the day, it was the way!” Traversing from St. Ignace to Miami, this highway originally followed an Indian trail and was the main thoroughfare of Michigan. While no longer an official state highway, the two lane road with hills, woods and farmlands channeling through charming small towns of mid-Michigan fuels driving thrills and family adventures. Taking this route sends travelers past farms and tiny markets bursting with seasonal selections.

Photo courtesy of the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA)

Photo courtesy of the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA)

3. Black River National Scenic Byway
Getting to this breathtaking road takes a bit of effort and long hours –but when travelling in an RV, one barely notices! Once you get to the town of Bessemer, in the western tip of the Upper Peninsula, and go north on CR 513, the scenery, natural beauty and history is worth the effort. This passage—once a wagon road—takes drivers past multiple waterfalls, old growth forests, iron mines and to the shores of Lake Superior.

Photo Courtesy of the Michigan Association of Recreation Vehicles and Campgrounds (MARVAC)

Photo Courtesy of the Michigan Association of Recreation Vehicles and Campgrounds (MARVAC)

Consider spending a weekend—or more—off the main highways and take a scenic tour of Pure Michigan this fall. Travelling by RV is an experience that won’t be soon forgotten. For more details on campgrounds and RV parks throughout the state, visit www.michiganrvandcampgrounds.org or facebook.com/MichiganRVers.

Where do you love to road trip? Let us know in the comments!

Meet the Blogger: The Michigan Association of Recreation Vehicles and Campgrounds (MARVAC) encourages growth in the recreation vehicle and private campground industries while contributing to the quality of Michigan tourism.

Five Michigan Crops to Cook With this Fall

Autumn in Michigan provides amazing produce for many of our seasonal favorite recipes. From ripe apples, pears, pumpkins and many more, it’s easy to support local growers in the Great Lakes state while enjoying some delicious and healthy food. Guest blogger Christina Carson from Awesome Mitten shares five crops to consider cooking with this fall.

With the crisp air of fall making its way back into Michigan, it’s hard not to get excited about the harvest season and all it brings. While some of the summer crops are starting to fade, the fall season offers a cornucopia of amazing local produce throughout the whole state.

A lot of folks don’t know that Michigan has the second most diverse production of fruits and vegetables in the country, beaten only by the ever-prevalent agriculture system of California. This means we have a near endless variety of amazing produce to choose from while supporting our own agricultural economy and local business owners.

Here are five fall Michigan crops that excite me the most. A few are expected favorites of everyone for the fall season, but I’m also including a few lesser-known crops that I encourage you to seek out and try.

1) Apples

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson.

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson

No article on Michigan’s fall crops would be complete without a mention of apples, of course. Michigan is the third largest producer of apples in the country, with an average of about 23 million bushels every year. This makes apples the largest fruit crop in Michigan. So no matter where you are in Michigan this fall, go ahead and find your way to an apple orchard – pick some apples, drink some cider and appreciate this amazing crop!

While an apple by itself may be a perfect snack, the options for cooking with apples are vast. Classic desserts like the apple pie and apple crisp should not be overlooked, but I challenge you to look past the pies and crisps this season. Put apples in your salads, roast them with carrots or stuff halved winter squash with sausage and apples before roasting for about an hour. You’ll know it’s done when the squash and apples are soft and the sausage is cooked.

2) Parsnips

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson.

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson

While often overlooked, parsnips might be my favorite fall vegetable. Their sweet white tubers don’t show up until the ground has been thoroughly frosted. The frost helps them convert starch to sugar and create that joyful flavor I can’t get enough of. They may not be a favorite of most, but you’ll find them in abundance at markets and stores throughout the state once the ground freezes.

Parsnips are best slow roasted, to bring out their natural sweetness. I like to chop them into cubes or fries, before tossing with a little olive oil, salt, pepper, and fresh rosemary. Roast them up at 375 degrees until soft inside and browning on the outside, about an hour depending how large you’ve chopped them.

Maybe you’ll become as hooked on them as I am.

3) Winter Squash

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson.

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson

Winter squash and pumpkins are surely one of the telltale signs of fall, and there is so much more to these delights than the pumpkin spice flavor. Slow cooking winter squash  in the oven for an hour or two is a great way to cozy up to the fall weather.

The varieties of squash available in Michigan are hugely diverse, especially if you buy them from a farm that enjoys growing lots of variety. While difficult to find because the seed is expensive, fairy squash is my absolute favorite. The perfectly smooth texture and sweet taste make them great for squash desserts or silky smooth pureed squash soup.

If pumpkins are more your thing, make sure to pick up some pie pumpkins and explore making your very own pumpkin puree this fall. Far tastier than the canned puree, all you have to do is halve your pumpkins and scoop out the seeds. Then set the pumpkins cut side down on a baking sheet. I like to put a little water in the sheet pan to keep them moist. Bake at 375 degrees for about an hour. Once the pumpkin’s meat is very soft, scoop it from the skin and puree!

4) Pears

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson.

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson

While apples may be the celebrated fall fruit crop, Michigan grows some phenomenal pears as well.

While not  grown on a massive scale, many apple orchards dabble in pears. Two of my personal favorites are the round, apple-looking Asian pear and  the rough, brown-skinned bosc pear. !

Perfectly ripe pears are a great snack on their own, but they also shine served sliced with cheeses. Pears can also serve as a substitute in just about any apple recipe you can think of or, if you’re feeling adventurous, poached. I highly suggest you slice up some pears and make yourself a simple pear crisp. I guarantee you’ll love it.

5) Watermelon Radishes

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson.

Photo courtesy of Christina Carson

In my mind, these radishes are a bit of magic. They show up in markets when the ground gets cold and almost resemble turnips instead of an actual radish. Smooth white orbs don’t look like all that much while they’re sitting on a farmer’s market table, but once you cut into these radishes, I can promise you’ll be hooked. The centers reveal a stunning bright magenta center, like cutting into a particularly colorful watermelon.

Watermelon radishes have a bit of a bite to them, but nothing too powerful. I find them best suited as a stunning salad topper, or sliced into chip-like slices and served on a veggie platter with hummus or another veggie dip.

What is your favorite Michigan fall recipe?

774908_10100241229705605_1160233728_oAbout the Author: Christina Carson is a northern Michigan girl through and though – addicted to the Lake Michigan coastline, our incredible local food system, and the mitten’s homegrown musicians. I share my passion for beautiful, delicious and joyful food through my blog and photography business – Toot Sweet. Keep an eye out for my monthly Michigan recipes on Awesome Mitten and follow Toot Sweet on Facebook and Instagram.