Six Autumn Experiences for a Fall Getaway in the Oscoda Area

This summer has been a memorable one, but we can’t wait for fall! Whether you want to enjoy the changing leaves or learn about unique Michigan history, the Oscoda area offers an unforgettable experience. Read more on just six of the many things to check out when visiting Oscoda, via The Oscoda Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.

The chance to experience Michigan’s beauty doesn’t end once fall brings about seasonal changes.

Photo Courtesy of The Oscoda Convention and Visitors Bureau

Photo Courtesy of The Oscoda Convention and Visitors Bureau

The lush greens of spring and summer turn to hues of orange, yellow and brown. Sandals, shorts and T-shirts are replaced by walking shoes, jackets and long pants to more comfortably explore Michigan’s natural beauty.

One perfect Michigan destination for day trippers and weekend explorers is the Oscoda area. Located on the east side of the state and on the south side of the Au Sable River in Iosco County, the Oscoda area features some of the state’s signature sites and experiences.

Here are some sites and experiences the Oscoda area offers for you next Pure Michigan adventure:

  • The 22-mile River Road National Scenic Byway is a great way to take in all the color Northeast Michigan has to offer. It stretches westward from Lake Huron into the Huron-Manistee National Forests. While visiting, don’t forget to drop by the 14-foot bronze Lumberman’s Monument statue and its accompanying visitor’s center. Travelers will also find numerous recreation opportunities, from motorized trails for off-road vehicles to quiet hiking trails.
  • The Iargo Springs Interpretive Site, also located on the River Road Scenic Byway, offers a breathtaking view of the Au Sable River Valley from its observation deck that is 300 feet above the river. The adventurous can also walk down a flight of 294 steps to experience where the underground springs come together and form cold water streams.
Photo Courtesy of The Oscoda Convention and Visitors Bureau

Photo Courtesy of The Oscoda Convention and Visitors Bureau

  • There are more than 3,500 acres of Michigan hiking trails in and around the Oscoda area. Visitors can head out on the Reid Lake Trail and see natural sites like a beaver pond, marshes and bogs, as well as an abundance of birds and wildlife. The Highbanks Trail is a 7-mile trail that gives hikers and backpackers a great view of the Au Sable River. The Highbanks Trail is also where you’ll see the MCRA Canoer’s Memorial Monument, which was erected in memory of canoe racers who have died.
Photo Courtesy of George Falkenhagen of Oscoda

Photo Courtesy of George Falkenhagen of Oscoda

  • The Au Sable and Oscoda Historical Society and Museum is where you’ll find Native American artifacts, as well as information about the region’s history concerning commercial fishing, ship wrecks and the railroad industry. The museum also has information about the Au Sable River, its dams and the notorious fire of 1911 that caused mass destruction to the community.
  • The Au Sable River Queen is the only paddle-wheel boat that runs from summer into fall, allowing passengers to take in the autumn colors from its decks. Passengers can enjoy a two-hour round trip on the Au Sable River, but should dress warm for those fall evenings and call in advance to reserve a spot.
  • Paul Bunyan Days will be held September 23-25 in downtown Oscoda. Come on out and bring the whole family for a day of fun, including carnival rides, craft vendors, a classic car show, a pie eating contest, kids activities and a hospitality tent with live music Friday night and Saturday night from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. There is a $5.00 admission fee, but children 16 and under can enter for free. Gates open Friday from 4 p.m.-10 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 989-739-0900 for more information.

For more information about the Oscoda area and the attractions you’ll find there, go to www.oscoda.com.

What do you plan to do in the Oscoda area this fall?

4 Ways to Stay Toasty This Fall with Michigan Craft Beer

Fall is quickly approaching and that means it’s color tour season. But even if you’re not a fall-color enthusiast, there’s something to look forward to when cooler weather greets the Great Lakes state. This autumn, warm up with a fall flavor tour when you Go Great Lakes Bay, when you can indulge in brewmasters’ fuller, richer, darker brews.

Read more on four ways you can #GoGreat and trace the trails of malty, hoppy goodness from one bold brew-lover’s excursion to the next! 

1. Try a sample at one of Michigan’s newest breweries

Oracle Brewing Company

Scheduled to open this fall at 122 N. Michigan Avenue in Old Town SaginawOracle Brewing Company will offer pub-style service where you can order your beer and take it back to your seat. Although food isn’t on the menu just yet, you’re welcome to bring your own or grab a slice from Old Town Pizzeria which is conveniently located in the same building. Expect a rustic, lounge-type feel from this brewery, with comfortable seating as well as more traditional tables.

Cozy up with a Michigan craft beer this autumn

Photo Courtesy of Go Great Lakes Bay

As for beer, get ready to try something new. “We’re ready to bring something completely different to the Great Lakes Region beer scene,” says Chris Younk, co-owner of the new venture with partner Cody Smith. “Right now we’re focused on creating beers that are light and easy drinking, like some very good pale ales.”

For the fall and winter months, they’re planning a few different beers to help keep you toasty. “Our efforts right now are a combination of making the beer we really like to enjoy for the fall and preparing for winter, when people will want an imperial stout or nice double IPA,” explains Younk.

“I like a good pumpkin beer, so we’ll consider that, but we don’t want to put anything out just to put it out,” Younk says. “It still has to meet our expectations.” Oracle Brewing is working with local suppliers to source various Michigan-grown ingredients. “We want to find opportunities to introduce non-traditional flavors into the beer in ways that will meet your expectations.”

One beer you should look out for when Oracle opens this autumn is a nice pale ale. “It will be pale to golden in color, probably around 4.5 – 5% ABV. It’s going to have a nice, decently thick head on it and some tropical fruity notes with some pine and citrus, but it’s going to be subdued. It will be a crisp beer that will make you want to take another sip.”

If you’re a fan of darker beer, you’re in luck! “We have a strong love for coffee, so another beer we’ll have this fall is a chocolate coffee porter or stout,” Younk says.  “It’s going to be a bigger bodied beer, dark brown, almost chestnut in color, with a nice, rich, creamy mouth feel.”

“Come in and see us when we open!” he says.

Other stops in Saginaw:

At JB Meinburg & Woody’s Draught House you’ll find over 100+ beers on tap. It’s a great place to stop for a flight and sample a few. Loggers Brewing Company is also scheduled to open this year – check their website for updates.

While you’re in Saginaw, don’t miss the The Taproom at Stardust Lanes, a unique venue with a fun bowling alley and taproom, where you’re sure to find something you like: the Taproom boasts 41 taps that feature craft beer from Michigan and around the country.

2. Give Hard Cider A Try

With more than 80 varieties of Michigan craft beer, 40 on tap at any time, WhichCraft Taproom in Midland is a beer-fan’s dream. But for those of you who want to try something a little different, they also serve Michigan-made cider (in addition to mead and wine.) If you haven’t yet tried hard cider, think about the traditional fall drink made with apples, then imagine it fermented and spiced. Similar to craft beer, cider makers start with a base and tweak it to produce different varieties and flavors. Whichcraft has several different kinds in cans or bottles (not on tap) so you can get a feel for what you like.

The Whichcraft Taproom has more than 40 delectable Michigan craft beers on tap

Photo Courtesy of Go Great Lakes Bay

Eastman’s Forgotten Ciders

In the small town of Wheeler, about half an hour southwest of Midland,  you’ll find, Eastman’s Forgotten Ciders, an apple orchard that doesn’t just grow and pick apples-they ferment and bottle cider, too. You can try the goods in their tasting room where they feature cider on tap.

Other stops in Midland:

The Great Lakes Bay Region has a lot of award-winning brews and Midland Brewing Company has won several, including a Bronze Medal at the World Expo of Beer for its Three Mile Marker Hefeweizen, which should be available this fall. Stop by and see what’s on tap.

3. Raise a glass at Michigan’s oldest brewery

Frankenmuth Brewery

The historical Frankenmuth Brewery has been operating in the iconic town of Frankenmuth for more than 150 years. Not content to rest on their historical laurels, Frankenmuth continues to create new brews and winning awards for their efforts, including two gold and one bronze medal at the 2016 World Expo of Beer.

Get ready for a blast from the past when you enter this functional but attractive brewery. “The bar and the back bar look like an old-school German brewery with wood floors and dark wood booths,” says Steve Buszka, Frankenmuth Brewery’s Brewmaster.

Frankenmuth Brewery is a must-visit when in the Great Lakes Bay Region

Photo Courtesy of Go Great Lakes Bay

This brewery is indeed old-school, but the beer is what locals and visitors alike look to enjoy in the city. “We make everything from light Kölsh to oatmeal coffee stout and everything in between,” says Buszka. Of our 20 beers on tap, 6 are German-style beers, but we’re also a craft-centric Michigan brewery.” That means that in addition to German beers, Frankenmuth serves their highly drinkable flagship brews, creative seasonal releases, and unique small batch brews.

This fall, Frankenmuth Brewing will craft a chestnut brown ale made with toasted chestnuts, that’s as-of-yet unnamed (just ask for it by description when you get there). “The toasted chestnuts impart a very autumn flavor to the beer,” Buszka says.

They’ll also be introducing two enticing IPAs, one of which, Ted Nugget, is made with 100% Michigan grown nugget hops. “The nugget hop is a hop varietal that’s going to have an earthy bitterness but a very citrusy, light grapefruit flavor to it,” says Buszka. If you’re an IPA fan be sure to ask for Wicked Warlock, a west-coast style Double IPA that they’ll have this fall. “I like to make beer that is balanced and smooth,’” Buszka says. “I know I’ve done my job right if you drink one, order another, and contemplate ordering a third!”

When you Go Great Lakes Bay region this autumn, you can also try their Oktoberfest beer and pumpkin beer. “We use all German hops, malts, and yeast in our Oktoberfest beer, which is going to be a very light amber beer with a nice, malty aroma,” says Buszka.

Pumpkin Chucker, their pumpkin brew, will “taste like liquid pumpkin pie, but it’s 8% alcohol,” Buszka cautions. Although many breweries sell their pumpkin beer on the market, Frankenmuth only serves it in-house. “Ours is just at the brewery, so if you want to try it, you’ll have to take a little trip to Frankenmuth.”

Other stops in Frankenmuth:

If you’re in the mood for traditional German food and want to try a few other Michigan beers (as well as a few from around the country), swing by Sullivan’s Black Forest Brew Haus & Grill while you’re in town.

4. Try the brewery whose beers have won a gold, silver and bronze

Tri-City Brewing Company 

If the summer Olympics has you dreaming of podium wins, Tri-City Brewing Company in Bay City is your next stop. In 2007, the second beer they introduced after opening, Phelan, won a bronze medal at its first World Expo of Beer. Tri-City has continued turning out winners, including three golds and a silver at the 2016 World Expo of Beer.

If you visit this fall, you can still find Tri-City Brewing at its original location (3020 North Water Street), which is truly  inviting with high ceilings and a bit of an industrial feel (it’s located in a former warehouse). But this popular brewery is growing so they’ll have new digs later this year (4170 Shrestha Drive). The new location will almost double their seating capacity giving them the capability to expand their tap line, which means they’ll have more tasty brews for you to try.

Make a splash this autumn by sharing Michigan craft beers with your friends

Photo Courtesy of Go Great Lakes Bay

You’ll find several Belgian beers on tap at Tri-City, because they’re a favorite of Brewmaster Paul Popa. “Belgian beers are different in the sense that they’re very flavorful and the aroma profiles is dominated by the Belgium yeast,” explains Popa. They often have floral or clove notes; you may pick up rose aroma or bubble gum notes or get a spiciness from a white or black pepper note.”

You can also look forward to their seasonal beers, like Oktoberfest. “That’s always a big one for us,” says Popa. “Our Oktoberfest is a little darker than most, with darker gold notes and almost an orange color. It’s a very malty, very clean lager, with about 6% alcohol. To me, it represents fall. I call it autumn in a glass.”

Another seasonal beer you’ll want to try is Tri-City’s Brownhoist Ale, whose namesake, Industrial Brownhoist, was once a major manufacturer of industrial cranes in the area. “We’ve won several awards with that beer,” Popa says. “It’s an easy drinking English brown ale, not too hoppy, very earthy, with caramel to toffee notes and only about 4.8% alcohol. It’s great in the fall when the weather starts to cool and leaves start to change.”

As long as you’re there, you should give their flagship beer, Hell’s Half Mile a whirl. Named after a rougher part of town in the old lumbering days, it’s a German lager with some malty, toasty notes. “It’s a very easy drinking beer and it’s the beer that we recommend people start with when they come here,” Popa says. “It’s very clean but has some flavor to it.”

Other stops in Bay City:

Lumber Barons Brewery is housed in an old lumber mill. Try the BBQ at Rusty Saw Smokehouse, located inside the brewery. With delicious flatbreads and 54 rotating taps featuring beers from Michigan and around the country, Tavern 101 is also worth a stop! If you’re in the mood for schnitzel, stop by Stein Haus and try theirs, while you sample the beers on tap.

For a unique group experience, schedule a ride to pedal your way along a Bay City pub tour on Sunrise Pedal Trolley (rides also available in Frankenmuth).

What is your favorite thing to do when visiting the Great Lakes Bay region? Share with us by commenting below!

Michigan’s Seven Best Paddling Trips

Guest blogger Jennifer Hamilton of the Awesome Mitten shares seven of the best destinations for paddling in Michigan. Read from her below and find more places to visit on michigan.org.

Summer may be rapidly coming to a close, but there is still plenty of time for a kayak trip in one of Michigan’s famous bodies of water. Whether you are seeking lakes or rivers, I have had the pleasure of polling fellow Awesome Mitten writers and compiling a list of Michigan’s favorite waterways.

1) Onekama to Arcadia via Lake Michigan – This is probably one of the most peaceful waterway treks in our Great Lakes State. Travelers have the opportunity to view Arcadia Bluffs from the water as they paddle by and scope out potential golfing opportunities. Since this area is part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, there are great dune adventures to have at almost every point along the way if you want to stop and picnic.

2) The Backwaters at Tippy Dam – The Backwaters at Tippy Dam are for the adventurous hoping to catch a glimpse of wildlife. Great fishing is available here if you are seeking walleye or small-mouthed bass. Experienced fishermen say that the panfish are abundant as well. Due to the wooded surroundings, there is a good chance that visitors will spot at least one eagle during their adventure. The peacefulness of these Backwaters is great for an escape from civilization and to truly get a Northern Michigan experience.

3) Canals of Detroit – While Detroit may not be the first place you think of to enjoy a water-filled experience; one particular Awesome Mitten-er offers a unique perspective on its waterways. Ms. Joanna Dueweke swears by touring Detroit’s canals via kayak or stand-up paddleboard. It’s a great way to enjoy the historical buildings and homes from a completely different point of view than the general public. Some of the best and most convenient places to launch are at Alter Road, St. Jean, or Belle Isle.

Turnip Rock, photographed by Lars Jensen

4) Turnip Rock Port Austin – If you have not had the pleasure of experiencing Turnip Rock via Lake Huron, I insist that you head there immediately. This enormous rock received its turnip connotation from thousands of years of erosion from storm waves. Now, it is an island with a few trees and little other vegetation. The land nearby is all privately owned, so the only way to view it is by waterway or trekking across a frozen Lake Huron in the winter. It is quite the comedic, awe-inspiring landmark, located at the tip of Michigan’s thumb.

5) The Platte River – The Platte River is a personal favorite and though it may not be a secret, it is worth a mention to remind you to traverse its calm, strangely warm waters. The Platte is a great place to take families as it is easy to navigate and always warm enough to tube if kayaks are not readily available. As part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, it is no surprise that the Platte River is absolutely stunning. Its ending pours out into Lake Michigan with a mini peninsula jutting out between the two, dividing the playful river and the wild waves.

6) Huron River near Ann Arbor – This is the only state-designated Country Scenic Natural River in Southeast Michigan. It is a huge river that covers five counties, with each portion being strikingly worthwhile. During various portions of the river, floaters can expect to come across an abundance of dams; there are 96 total, to be exact. Many of these dams were built for mill or hydroelectric power, making them fairly large. Due to the size of these dams, many new lakes have formed along the Huron River, making for exciting sites to see almost every portion of the way.

7) Two Hearted River, Eastern Upper Peninsula – Any river that has a beer named after it clearly needs to be traversed. It is a fairly short river that empties into Lake Superior, and it does a great job of capturing the Upper Peninsula’s natural beauty. At the mouth of the river, travelers can see a Michigan Historic Marker; formally known as the Two-Hearted Life Saving Station, which then became part of the United States Coast Guard in 1915. The Two-Hearted River is exceptionally famous for a great place to leisurely fish, probably while enjoying a nice Two-Hearted Ale from Bell’s Brewery.

Jennifer Hamilton is a feature writer for The Awesome Mitten. Jennifer lives in Traverse City where she works for Addiction Treatment Services and is earning her Master of Social Work and Master of Arts in Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

Do you have a favorite Michigan paddling trip that’s not on the list? Share with us below!