Seven Ways to Spend New Year’s Eve Pure Michigan Style

It seems like just yesterday we were ringing in 2014 and looking forward to another great year in Pure Michigan. But don’t get nostalgic just yet – this year’s fun is far from over! If you’re looking for a great New Year’s Eve event to attend in Michigan, check out these seven events happening around the state.

Marquette Ball Drop

New Year’s Eve Ball Drop, Marquette
Every New Year’s Eve, the intersection of Washington Street and Front Street becomes the location where locals and visitors come together in a large crowd to welcome in the New Year. On the 12th strike, an illuminated ball is lowered from the historic Savings Bank Building. This year will mark the 26th anniversary of ringing in the New Year Marquette style!

Hot New Year’s Eve Celebration, Grand Rapids
If you’re looking for music, dancing and fun on New Year’s Eve, look no further than Grand Rapids! This year’s Hot New Year’s Eve Celebration will include Cobra Starship, The Outer Vibe, Dyllan Murray, and Grand Rapids Got Talent winner, Fire Alarm. There will also be the annual ball drop at midnight. Just in case you get a little cold, there will be a warming tent with free hot chocolate and coffee for all who pass through.

Midnight-on-Main_Countdown-300x168Midnight on Main New Year’s Celebration, Midland
One of the Michigan’s largest New Year celebrations can be found in the heart of the state – Midland!! It’s Midnight on Main, but the party begins long before midnight with a full schedule of entertainment and activities. The event features four heated tents, 10 bars, food vendors, Michigan’s largest ball drop and an exciting fireworks display. The event is held on Main Street, from Gordon Street to Townsend Street, in Downtown Midland. Midnight on Main is a ticketed event for ages 21+.

Charlevoix Bridge Drop, Charlevoix
Celebrate New Year’s Eve with a bang! Charlevoix’s second annual Bridge Drop will ring in 2015 with a downtown party full of festivities and fun. Daytime family friendly activities include a winter petting zoo, camel rides, snowman building, food trucks, s’mores and bonfires. The evening’s events of live music and activities throughout Charlevoix’s restaurants, bars and shops will culminate with the “bridge drop” and firework display at midnight. Fun for all, and all for fun!

NYE-in-Pure-Ludington2015 New Year’s Eve Ball Drop, Ludington
Beginning at 9:30 p.m., make your way to the North James Street Plaza in Ludington where you’ll enjoy music, an entertainment tent, commemorative light-up glasses, fireworks, and of course, Michigan’s largest environmentally friendly New Year’s Eve Ball.  Bring your family and friends to experience this amazing night! If you’re looking for something to do before the festivities, don’t forget about the Resolution Run 5K also taking place at 9 a.m. at the OJ DeJonge Middle School North Gym.

Cherry Ball Drop, Traverse City
Ring in the New Year in beautiful downtown Traverse City and watch a giant cherry drop as 2015 begins! The event will also feature Magic 4 Humans at Traverse City Opera House) and Magic at Midnight at Top of the Park (both are ticketed events). If you’re looking for a New Year’s Eve celebration in Northern Michigan, the annual Cherry Ball Drop is the event for you!

New Year’s Eve Anchor Drop, Port Huron
Ring in the New Year in the city of Port Huron! The New Year’s Eve Anchor Drop is a New Year’s countdown party with a maritime twist. A lighted anchor will drop from the top of the 150-foot McMorran Tower at midnight! Live music, beer tent, free open skating, and much more.

 For a complete list of events happening on New Year’s Eve, visit michigan.org/events. How are you planning to celebrate the new year near you? 

A Singing Christmas Tree and 3 More Holiday Displays You Have to See to Believe

It’s time to the deck the halls in Pure Michigan! Many Michigan cities are already twinkling with holiday spirit. We’ve rounded up just a few of the most unbelievable holiday displays from around the state – one of them even sings! Check them out below. 

America’s Tallest Singing Christmas Tree – Muskegon
This Muskegon area event presented by Mona Shores High School has become a tradition for families near and far as a way of kicking off their holiday and getting into the spirit of the season. With its 25,000 colored lights, 15 tiers that reach 67 feet up into the majestic Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts, over 275 singers, the Singing Christmas Tree must be seen to be believed.

Photo via Singing Christmas Tree - Mona Shores Choir on Facebook

Photo via Singing Christmas Tree – Mona Shores Choir on Facebook

Michigan’s Official Christmas Tree – Downtown Lansing
The 2014 official state Christmas tree is a 63-foot blue spruce tree harvested in Kingsford in the Upper Peninsula. Nearly 9,000 lights wrap the tree outside the Capitol Building in Downtown Lansing. Each year, Michigan’s official Christmas Tree is lit during Silver Bells in the City which draws thousands of spectators (nearly 70,000 in 2014!).

Photo via Instagram user @brettking

Photo via Instagram user @brettking

Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland – Frankenmuth
The world’s largest Christmas store with over 90,000 square ft of decorations is a shopper’s dream! Bigger than 1 1/2 football fields in size featuring over 50,000 trims, gifts, and collectibles. There are more than 350 decorated Christmas trees displayed in Bronner’s salesroom, and approximately 100,000 outdoor Christmas lights that illuminate Bronner’s grounds every evening throughout the year. Get more Bronner’s fun facts here.

Photo courtesy of Bronner's CHRISTmas Wonderland

Photo courtesy of Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland

Menorah in the D - Campus Martius Park, Detroit
Celebrated this year on December 16th, Menorah in the D is a community-wide menorah lighting event at Campus Martius Park in downtown Detroit.  The 26 ft tall menorah was designed and built by the artists Erik & Israel Nordin of the Detroit Design Center in Corktown.

Photo courtesy of @MenorahintheD on Instagram

Photo courtesy of @MenorahintheD on Instagram

Have you seen any unbelievable holiday displays near you? 

Try to Pronounce the Names of These 12 Michigan Destinations (#7 is a Tongue Twister!)

Have you ever wondered how Michigan was named Michigan? Before colonization, the now Great Lakes State was home to at least eight Native American tribes throughout the land, one of which being the Ojibwe Indians. The Ojibwe were the first people to openly interact with the French in Michigan, trading furs and knowledge of the area for guns and goods. Through translation, the state of Michigan was named after the Ojibwe Indian word “Michigama,” which means “great lake” or “land surrounded by water.”

With this in mind, we invite you to take a look at some other uniquely-named destinations found across the Great Lakes State.

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1. Mackinac Island. This is an easy one. If you’re a native Michigander, you know that this popular Northern Michigan destination is correctly pronounced “Mackinaw Island”. Tourists have visited Mackinac Island in the summers to escape the heat of the cities for hundreds of years. Condé Nast Traveler magazine added Mackinac Island to its “World’s Best” list as one of the top 10 islands in the world. In December 2007 National Geographic Traveler magazine named Mackinac Island as the top island destination in the United States and 8th in the world. Don’t forget the fudge!

2. Tahquamenon. One of Michigan’s most popular waterfalls, Tahquamenon Falls, can be found in the Upper Peninsula in appropriately named Paradise, MI. If you’ve ever wondered how to correctly pronounce the falls, it rhymes with “phenomenon.”

3. Ypsilanti. Ip-sill-ann-tee, or Ypsi to those who know it well, is located just down the road from Ann Arbor. Home to Eastern Michigan University, the city was originally a trading post set up in 1809 and called Woodruff’s Grove after Major Thomas Woodruff. The name was later changed to Ypsilanti in 1829 in honor of Demetrius Ypsilanti. Ypsilanti was a hero in the Greek War of Independence from the Ottoman Empire.

4. Menominee.  Menominee (Men-om-in-e) is located at the gateway between the Upper Peninsula and Northeastern Wisconsin. This Pure Michigan destination gets its name from a regional Native American tribe known as the Menominee, which translates into “Wild Rice.” The area was originally the home of the Menominee Indian Tribe, who now have a reservation along Wolf River in Northern Wisconsin. Visitors can enjoy hunting, fishing, camping, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, hiking and much more.

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 5. Sault Ste. Marie. The Soo! If you’ve traveled north of the Mackinac Bridge, you’ve probably passed through the town of Soo-Saynt-Ma-Ree. The Soo is home to many Michigan treasures, such as the Soo Locks and Lake Superior State University. If you do venture north, you’ll discover the rushing waterfalls that give way to majestic forests, rocky coastlines leading to picturesque lighthouses and engineering feats of man stand side-by-side with small fishing skiffs and buckets of bait.

 6. Hamtramck. Hamtramck (Ham-tram-ick) grew into a Polish enclave between 1910 and 1920 when large number of Polish laborers arrived seeking employment. Today, Hamtramck includes many different ethnic groups, but maintains its Polish identify as can be found in the shops, restaurants and bakeries in the area with a pierogi and a paczki.

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 7. Kitch-iti-kipi. Pronounced Kitch-i-tee-ki-pee (say that five times fast!) is another U.P. gem located in scenic Palms Book State Park. Known as “The Big Spring”, Michigan’s largest freshwater spring is two hundred feet across and 40 feet deep. Over 10,000 gallons a minute gush from fissures in the underlying limestone as the flow continues throughout the year at a constant 45 degree Fahrenheit. By means of a self-operated observation raft, visitors are guided to vantage points overlooking fascinating underwater features and fantasies.

8. Dowagiac. The Grand Old City of southwestern Michigan. Dowagiac, pronounced deh-wah-jak, is nestled within the Fruit Belt, the city is surrounded by rolling farmlands and abundant orchards.  Enjoy fishing, canoeing, boating, water skiing and ice fishing.  Be sure to tour the historic train depot, too

9. Charlotte. If you’ve been pronouncing Charlotte like the city in North Carolina, guess again! Shar-lot (Not Char-lit) is located southwest of Lansing and home to some of the most beautiful historical buildings in Michigan. Charlotte annually welcomes visitors to experience the Eaton County Fair in mid-July and the pioneer spirit of the ever-popular Frontier Days in early September.

10. Bete Grise. Beet grease, you say? Not quite! Bay-dee-gree can be found southwest of Copper Harbor on Keweenaw County’s south shore. Bete Grise (French for “Grey Beast”) has a beautiful white sand beach as well as a wetland preserve stretching along Lake Superior.

11. Baraga. Bare-uh-gah is named after Bishop Frederick Baraga, located in Baraga County in the Western Upper Peninsula. Check out the statue of Bishop Baraga, which stands 35 feet tall and weighs four tons, holding a cross (7 feet high) and snowshoes (26 feet long.)  It floats on a cloud of stainless steel, supported by five laminated wood beams representing Baraga’s five major missions.

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12. Isle Royale. Last but not least, Isle Royal (Not roy-ale!) Wolves and moose, the wild North Woods forest, ever-changing weather and a cool climate, and the crystal clear waters and rugged shoreline of Lake Superior characterize Isle Royale’s National Park.  Roadless Isle Royale is accessible only by boat or float plane.  This is a Pure Michigan destination fit for royalty – if you love the outdoors!

Do you have any Michigan tongue-twisters to add to our list? Tell us below!