Eight Reasons to Love Ypsilanti

Ypsilanti – generally referred to as “Ypsi” by the locals – is a progressive city just four miles east of Ann Arbor. The city is rich in history and thrives with a creative community. Surely, there are more than 8 reasons to love Ypsilanti, but this list from Visit Ypsi will get you started!

1. The Events

Events are a large part of Ypsilanti’s culture and keep visitors coming back for more – from weekly cruise nights and farmers markets, to art shows and air shows. Ypsilanti is home to major annual events such as, Michigan ElvisFest, Michigan Brewers Guild Summer Beer Festival, The Color Run Michigan Eastside, and the Thunder Over Michigan Air Show. These events attract thousands of visitors and are just a few of the events that help make Ypsi unique and thriving. Click here for a list of the city’s major events.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

2. The Food

Adventurous diners and comfort-food connoisseurs will have their cravings satisfied in Ypsilanti. Fresh salads, cultural fusions, classic barbecue, and ample amounts of mac and cheese can be found on menus in the charming city. The city has a passion for mastering the burger, crafting local beers, and creating artisanal coffee beverages. But the best part is that every dining hotspot is 100% authentic, local, and served with a smile.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

3. The Parks

Ypsi parks offer the perfect setting for afternoon strolls, concerts, ballgames, and more. Riverside Park hosts the majority of the city’s outdoor events and runs along the historic Huron River. Just across the “tridge” is Frog Island where you can find a gorgeous/unique amphitheater and a spacious soccer field. Ypsi has endless parks tucked away as you wander through the city and contributes to the 400 square miles of parks in Southeast Michigan (also known as The Big 400).

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

4. The People

Many people who choose to live in Ypsi are attracted to its sense of community, but the hometown-feel is not exclusive to locals. “Ypsilantians” care about their city and are passionate about sharing it with others. The affordable housing has drawn in a creative community – which is why you will find art galleries inside third-wave coffee houses, or a rustic beer pub inside a renovated historic warehouse. Visiting Ypsi is as good as making time for your creative side. The spirit of the community, made by the people, will align your mind with inspiration.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

5. The University

Eastern Michigan University’s campus is a beautiful gem in Ypsi. Historic and modern architecture create a unique juxtaposition for students and visitors. An active student body hosts many research symposiums, athletic events, and art happenings. You can find affordable and unique dining experiences close to campus (and for an insider tip: campus is a great place for a breezy walk or bike ride). Go Eagles!

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

6. The Shopping

Bring an extra suitcase when you Visit Ypsilanti! You are sure to be packed with antiques, novelties, and artisan gifts by the time you make your way home. The rare antique shopping is a regional attraction and quirky storefronts are full of must-have knick-knacks.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

7. The History

Many people want to know about the origin of the tongue-twisting name, Ypsilanti, but that’s only one of many fascinating stories that can be told about the individualistic city. (It’s pronounced ip-suh-lan-tee, by the way, and you can learn more about the name by clicking here).

Early settlements of Native American tribes along the Huron River is where the story begins. In later years, Ypsilanti played a major role in WWII at the Willow Run Bomber Plant (home to many real life Rosie-the-Riveters), and also laid claim to the last Hudson Dealership.

Ypsi has four local museums dedicated to preserving and sharing stories throughout the centuries. However, simply walking through the streets will take you back in time – historic architecture lines the city’s sidewalks, and heritage events take place throughout the year.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

8. The Neighbors

Ypsilanti is surrounded by seven outstanding communities – each with their own unique events, shopping, dining, and outdoor activities. Nationally acclaimed theatres, fun-in-the-sun waterparks, and art and music festivals should be added to your Ypsi itinerary. All of these adventures and more can be easily accessed by major highways (with a complimentary scenic drive) just minutes away from Downtown Ypsi!

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Honorable Mention: The Water Tower

A blog like this wouldn’t be complete without mention of Ypsilanti’s historic water tower. Built in 1890, Ypsi’s water tower stands 147 feet tall in the middle of the city.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

There is so much more to discover in Ypsilanti. Click here to start your journey, or follow this blog for regular updates about the unique Pure Michigan city!

What do you love about Ypsilanti? 

10 Fun Facts About Michigan International Speedway

Photo courtesy of Craig Gardiner Photography

Photo courtesy of Craig Gardiner Photography

Pure Michigan 400 race weekend is here! More than 100,000 fans will be at Michigan International Speedway to cheer on their favorite drivers as they race around NASCAR’s fastest track on August 17th.

Think you know NASCAR? Test your knowledge with these lesser known facts about Michigan International Speedway

  • The 40 trams used at MIS that bring fans from the parking lots to the track were the same trams used at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.
  • Five-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Champion Jimmie Johnson has never won at MIS, but he’s the honorary president of the MIS Kids Club. He even holds special events at the track.
  • There are 9,000 campsites at MIS – making it the largest registered campground in the State of Michigan.
  • Marcos Ambrose broke the 200 MPH barrier in qualifying in 2012. Marcus was recorded at 203.241 mph.
  • Bill Elliot is the active driver who has led the most laps at MIS. In his 37 year racing career Elliot has been in the lead at MIS for 1004 laps.
  • Parking is always free at MIS! Guests can also bring in their own food and beverages, and parking lots open two hours before the grandstand so there is plenty of time for tailgating.
  • MIS is NASCAR’s fastest racetrack! MIS is superfast due to the repave in 2012 and long straightaways on the track that let drivers reach their highest speeds.
  • People have gotten married at the track before, but did you know that Roger Curtis presided over the wedding? It’s true! Roger Curtis, the president of MIS is an ordained minister and married a happy couple in Gatorade Victory Lane on June 17, 2012.
  • David Pearson has won the most Cup poles at MIS with 10. Who will take the pole this year?
  • MIS is the only racetrack where a fan awards a special trophy to the winning driver and team. It’s part of MIS’s Fan Appreciation Program.

Plan a visit to MIS and other Michigan automotive attractions at michigan.org. Follow the race on Twitter at #PureMichigan400. 

Four Types of Detroit Tours You’ll Want to Experience

Today, guest blogger Dan Fuoco of Visit Detroit gives us some tips for exploring the city with these four types of Detroit tours

Photo courtesy of Instagram user @phillyd1834 | Detroit Tours

Photo courtesy of Instagram user @phillyd1834

Detroit tours are not cookie-cutter or identical – they are custom, one-of-a-kind, jam-packed journeys that will transform your notion of Detroit and leave your thirsting for more knowledge and curious enough to explore on your own.

The right tour can be found based on these four types of Detroit tour experiences:

Historical Tours

The American Revolution. The Underground Railroad. Birthplace of the automobile. The Civil Rights movement. If you didn’t already realize it, these Detroit tours are a goldmine for history geeks.

Historians adore The Henry Ford Museum mainly because of its popular artifacts which include Abraham Lincoln’s rocking chair (from the night of his assassination) and the bus where Detroiter Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger, sparking the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Photo courtesy of the Detroit Historical Society | Detroit Tours

Photo courtesy of the Detroit Historical Society

Also a must-stop location on your Detroit tour itinerary, the Detroit Historical Museum is one of the oldest and largest museums dedicated to metropolitan history in the U.S., encompassing more than three centuries of metro Detroit history. A self-guided Detroit tour is the best way to soak up just the right amount of history without a factual overload.

Musical Tours

Every Detroit tour must include a visit to Motown Museum where you will literally walk the hallways once frequented by Motown legends Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson, Diana Ross, The Temptations and The Supremes, to name a few. Enter Studio A and relive the humming, snapping, and foot-tapping that swept the nation.

FREE Tours

Detroit Riverfront and GM Renaissance Center | Detroit Tours

Detroit Riverfront and GM Renaissance Center

Did You Know? The “Mo” in Motown was derived from “Motor City” which pays homage to the ultra-obvious notion that Detroit is the car capital of the world! Detroit and its metro area are world headquarters to all three major US automakers: Ford, Chrysler, and GM. Every tour of Detroit should stop at the world headquarters and the iconic building in Detroit’s skyline, the General Motors Renaissance Center. Free tours of the GM Renaissance Center take visitors through the automaker’s showroom, highlighting vintage, new and concept vehicles. The grand finale is a glass elevator ride to the 72nd floor of the Detroit Marriott Hotel and tallest hotel in the Western Hemisphere.

Outdoor Tours

Detroit has been called the Paris of the Midwest because of its attention to fine architecture; it is one of the only cities in the country so faithfully emblematic of this architectural style. A Detroit tour focused on architecture should include visiting works from Albert Kahn, George D. Mason and Wirt C. Rowland. Minoru Yamasaki, who later designed the World Trade Center, also got his start in Detroit, where he designed buildings including One Woodward Avenue.

Must-sees should include the historic Westin Book Cadillac Detroit hotel, built in the 1900s; the Chicago style-influenced Penobscot Building, designed by Rowland and Detroit sculptor Corrado Parducci; the art deco Guardian Building; and the Fisher and General Motors Building (Cadillac Place), both designed by Kahn and located in Detroit’s New Center area.

Have you gotten the opportunity to tour Detroit? Let us know what you saw during your visit!

Dan Fuoco_2014_portraitDan Fuoco is the Interactive Marketing Manager for the Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau (VisitDetroit) and is responsible for building and engaging with VisitDetroit’s social media and blog communities.  You can find him geeking out over: social media infographics, muscle cars and Detroit. Follow him on TwitterInstagram and periodically on Pinterest.