Enter If You Dare! Thirteen Haunted Places in Marquette, Michigan

These eerie attractions are not for the faint of heart! Today, Barry Winslow from Travel Marquette shares ghost stories from the thirteen most haunted places in Marquette – just in time for a Halloween visit! 

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Old City Orphanage – Fisher Street
Extremely popular among city residents and students too, the Old City Orphanage is widely considered one of the most haunted locations in Marquette County. A favorite during the Halloween season, the Old City Orphanage is full of ghostly spirits and haunted tales. One thing is for certain though…there is a spooky energy floating within the orphanage’s walls.

Stories deemed to be true have been passed of an orphanage nun who once beat a young boy so badly, he died almost immediately. A funeral service was to be held in the orphanage’s basement for the children and faculty only, but the nun did not want to be punished for the beating and buried the boy in nearby Park Cemetery on Seventh Street. Somehow, the boy’s spirit escaped the cemetery and he can be seen lying in a coffin in the orphanage’s basement; illuminated by a faint green glow.

304 Halverson Hall
In the late 1960’s, a Northern student who stayed in this room hung herself from her top bunk. It has been reported that her ghost still haunts the halls of the third floor of Halverson. It has been reported that sometimes late at night, the sound of fingernails scratching along the blackboards in the study rooms on the third floor of Halverson can be heard.

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Landmark Inn
Prestigious for its tall stature, breathtaking views from the rooms of Lake Superior and its ideal location in downtown Marquette, the Landmark Inn ranks as one of the most popular sites in the city. Plenty of Landmark ghost stories have been shared since its existence, all eerie in their own right, but one of which seems to always top the ranks as the downright spookiest.

Tucked in the far corner of the sixth floor of the Landmark Inn is the Lilac Room. A large room used today as a banquet and hospitality dinner space, the Lilac Room is known for its elegant and historic décor. The ghost story surrounding the Lilac Room goes that the telephone switchboard in the lobby on the main floor of the hotel receives calls from the room although it is not occupied by any guests or workers.

Theories have been made that the person making the calls is that of the Lilac Lady, a former lover of a sailor who frequently stayed in the Lilac Room and once went to sail on Lake Superior and never returned. Being completely heartbroken, the Lilac Lady committed suicide in the room by tying multiple lilac imprinted napkins together and hanging herself outside one of the room’s many windows.

Current hotel workers have described numerous sightings in the hall of the sixth floor of the ghost of the Lilac Lady wearing a floral gown after the switchboard calls were made. To this very day, the hotel lobby switchboard continues to ring and more and more sightings of the Lilac Lady ghost are reported.

Forest Roberts Theatre – Northern Michigan University
In the early 1970’s, an NMU employed janitor fell victim to a serious heart attack in the elevator shaft that connects the Forest Roberts Theatre to the Thomas Fine Arts Building. A heavier set gentleman with a full beard and jovial persona, the physical work simply caught up to him late one Friday evening as he took his last breath in the elevator shaft. No ghostly sightings of the janitor have ever been reported, but mysterious occurrences with the elevator have. After class hours, cameras installed in the hall frequently capture the elevator changing floors, doors opening with no one inside and the operational lights turning on and off. Apparently, the janitor’s spirit is still uneasy after all these years…

Marquette Harbor Lighthouse
The mystery of the Marquette Harbor Lighthouse is a spooky one, which many local residents may not know. Taylor Adams, a worker at the Marquette Maritime Museum and daughter of the former coastguard station chief, lived in the small white house on the point where the lighthouse stands. On several accounts, Taylor has witnessed a small ghost of a girl on the upper floor of the lighthouse. Standing in broad daylight, this ghostly figure of a girl is seen staring out the upper floor window, peering out at the horizon of Lake Superior. It has been reported that the girl prefers catching a glimpse of the horizon when Lake Superior is in a calm state, as the winds of the lake stir up the sounds of the souls of her long lost mother and father, proving too much for her to bear.

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Big Bay Point Lighthouse
Located approximately 25 miles Northwest of Marquette is the small town of Big Bay, Michigan. A few street crossings comprised of churches, a motel, and the Thunder Bay Inn (an old depot bought by Henry Ford in the 1940’s that now functions as a hotel and restaurant) are the few attractions that make up the setting of the village. Jutting to the northeast of the town on the shores of Lake Superior is Big Bay Point, where Big Bay Point Lighthouse, built in 1896, stands on its own.

The first lighthouse keeper, William Prior, was an ornery and hardworking keeper of the light and was a perfectionist when it came to the duties of tending the light and grounds. Journaling in his logbook, Prior complained of the incompetence and weak work ethic of the many assistant keepers of the light. Eventually, Prior’s son took on the job as assistant light keeper, even he knowing that his own father was tough to work with due to his stubbornness and quick temper. This brought upon a sense of fear to Prior’s son.

One day, Prior’s son was working on the pier on the north side of the point. Taking a false step he lost his balance and fell on the concrete, cracking his shin bone and cutting himself. Afraid to tell his ornery father of the mishap, he continued working hard keeping up the grounds as his father would have wished. It wasn’t long before gangrene set in and the son fell brutally ill. With no clear trails or roads in Big Bay at this time, the fastest way to Marquette to receive medical assistance was by rowboat. William rowed ferociously to Marquette with all of his might to save his ill son, but it was too late. William’s son died in the rowboat before he could reach shore. A funeral was scheduled for William’s son the following day, but it was not enough to bury the growing sorrow in Mr. Prior.

Returning to Big Bay the following day and falling further into depression, Mr. Prior left a note on the table for Jenny Beamer, the wife of another assister light keeper. The note read, “Jenny, that’s it. I’m taking a gun and cyanide into the woods. Goodbye.” Theory goes is that Jenny, who was no stranger to Mr. Prior’s ornery personality, happened upon him in the woods debating which weapon to use. Gun or cyanide? Cyanide or gun? Jenny, who “just so happened” to have a length of rope with her in her hand approached him and said, “Oh, William. Having a problem? I have a solution. Stand on my basket and take this rope around your neck and we’ll make this quick and easy for you.”

Two years later, a walker came across the head of Mr. Prior hanging from a maple tree about two miles into the woods from the lighthouse. To this day, reports of visitors staying at the Big Bay Point Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast are awoken by the ghost of an elderly groundskeeper with coastguard attire and a thick red mustache standing at the foot of their bed in the middle of the night. One minute he’s there, the next, disappearing into the walls of the lighthouse.

Thunder Bay Inn
One of the most notable attractions in Big Bay, Michigan is that of the Thunder Bay Inn. Originally used as a “one-stop shop” facility functioning as a depot, first aid station, and a storage site for the mill across the street, the Thunder Bay Inn was built for and purchased by Henry Ford and used as an Inn for personal friends and family. With a long business history featuring everything from Brunswick billiard tables and bowling pins to wood refinishing for Ford’s “Woody” stylized Model-A and Model-T cars, numerous ghost stories have been told of past inn keepers and hotel guests.

The most notable ghost story of the Thunder Bay Inn took place in the upstairs hallway. Duke, the son of the current owner of the Inn, works as a tour guide for hotel guests and visitors and also lives in the Inn’s back upstairs apartment. One night, after closing up the Inn and doing the final linen wash, Duke headed down the stairs to the Inn’s back kitchen to fix himself a sandwich. Returning up the stairs, he peered to his left and gazed down the long upstairs hallway as he did every night. To his amazement, he stood in complete shock as he watched the wooden baby rocking chair in the hall slowing moving back and forth.

Knowing that the Inn has no ventilation system and having closed every door and window just prior to making his nighttime snack, Duke couldn’t help but believe that what he was watching was the antics of a female ghost rocking her baby to sleep. Duke has mentioned that even more paranormal activity has occurred in the Inn and claims that the ghost is a friendly one, not disturbing any guests or workers but instead is a motherly spirit who frequently tends to her child. Friendly as the ghost may seem, Duke continues to keep his distance to prevent disturbing the ghost. Who knows what it may do when it is angry…

Marquette Monthly
Located on Third Street in Marquette, the Marquette Monthly magazine is a staple to the community when it comes to producing one of few printed publications in the county covering everything from entertaining events to local arts and culture. Marquette Monthly magazine issues date back to 1999, but the building where the magazine is headquartered is much older. Once a two story house, the Marquette Monthly building was constructed in the late 1930’s and wasn’t purchased by the magazine until the 1990’s. The transition from house to publication business was a natural fit, though, as it was discovered that the top floor of the house once operated as a small printing office that produced time cards and delivery notes for the train depots in the area.

Stories are told to this day about the first print press worker, Beth Ann, who lived upstairs and worked the print office when the building was first built. With a daily regimen of loading the large metal printing press with ink, changing out the machine’s characters and fonts and handling all print deliveries, unclogging paper jams was a very common occurrence. A dangerous job, Beth Ann had to use extreme caution around the machine’s sharp edges and moving inner parts.

One day, just before the first train was to roll into the depot, Beth Ann’s shirt sleeve got caught in the printing press’ card stock feeder and the machine slowly began to inch her arm closer and closer to the letter press. Being the only person in the office, her blood curdling screams were never heard. That night, Beth Ann’s husband came home from work to find his wife lying on the floor next to the printing press, arm missing, covered in her own blood. Workers at the Marquette Monthly have reported screams coming from the top floor of the building late at night. It seems as if the ghost of Beth Ann still lives on today.

Acocks Medical Center at Morgan Heights – County Road 492
Nestled on the side of County Road 492, between Marquette and Negaunee, in an area known as Morgan Heights, sit two brick houses that were once part of a large tuberculosis medical hospital named Acocks. Built in the late 1930’s, Acocks Medical Center stretched a great distance along the side of County Road 492. Medical staff and cliental resided in the two brick houses that still stand today. These houses were connected to Acocks, which has since been demolished, by a series of underground tunnels. Acocks is known to be the type of facility where one checks in but never checks out!

Medical advancements to better cure tuberculosis came well after Acocks was constructed, so experimental treatments were used on Acocks’ many patients that would never be carried out today. Stories are told of mentally and physically ill patients who were treated with electric shock therapy and copious amounts of morphine tainted elixirs. Psychic mediums and local journalists have even toured the tunnels since Acocks was demolished and have detected paranormal occurrences and cold spots where ghostly spirits live on today. In a field just out front of the two stone houses, a paranormal psychic reported seeing hundreds of ghostly souls of the ill patients deliriously wandering, still lost in their medically induced stupors. Let’s just say there’s something really eerie going on at Acocks.

Chocolay River Trading Post – Front Street
Standing outside of Wells Fargo bank and looking directly across Front Street you’ll see a large downtown building that is occupied by Chocolay River Trading Post, a local downtown furniture store, and Elizabeth’s Chop House. With a large basement extending downward to the parking lot located behind the building at lake level, this gigantic historic downtown structure was once home to Oakley’s Furniture Store. The basement of this building, though, has its own spooky past.

Old photographs of downtown Marquette show the sign suspended from the building’s façade reading “Oakley’s Furniture / Undertaking.” Apparently, cadaver embalmment was practiced in this building’s basement and city morticians of the time would preserve the dead throughout the long Marquette winters for summer burials and funeral processions.

Cabin 13 at Bay Cliff Health Camp – Big Bay
Located about 25 miles northwest of Marquette in Big Bay is Bay Cliff Health Camp. A nonprofit summer therapy camp for children who need assistance with occupational, speech, hearing, and vision therapy, the 130-acre property is a northern Michigan vista surrounded with hardwood forest and gorgeous views of Lake Independence and Lake Superior. Bay Cliff was built in 1934 and is comprised of numerous cabins, lunch halls, common rooms, meeting space and outdoor parks. Originally, Bay Cliff was opened to care for malnourished and underprivileged children before turning its focus to the more therapy-based camp of today.

Rumors have been spread of spirits and ghostly figures of past residents and children that haunt the old cabins and common rooms of the camp. Many stories have been passed down of the camp over the years, but the haunting of Cabin 13 continues to be one of the most told.

It is reported that long ago there was a child named Sam staying at the camp that committed suicide and his ghost still haunts Bay Cliff. A large L-shaped common building at the camp is nicknamed “Sam’s Place” as it was in this building’s center room that Sam passed away. Sam had reportedly grown up in a poor household in Ishpeming and began to attend camp at a young age when his parents felt it would be best for him to be a part of a camp setting in the summer months. It is reported that Sam also had poor eyesight and wore large circular glasses that hung low over the bridge of his nose and was an exceptional artist as well.

The haunting of the center room in “Sam’s Place” is another ghost story floating around Bay Cliff, but it is rumored that Sam lived in Cabin 13 during his time there. Sam’s cabin walls were covered with his artwork as well as the paintings of the artists he so dearly admired. The story goes that one night at camp another resident began bullying Sam for his “nerdy” appearance and the size and shape of his glasses. The resident continued to bully Sam by destroying some of his artwork and stomping on his glasses. Not having the ability to see to paint without his glasses, Sam was unable to replicate his destroyed works and fell into severe depression. It is said that Sam went to the center room at “Sam’s Place” and used the sharp tip of an old feather pen as a knife to end his life.

Sam’s ghost is said to haunt Cabin 13 to this very day. Residents in the cabin have claimed that heavy paintings on the walls of the cabin would fall to the ground at night and wake the campers from their sleep. Then, just as they were about to hang the paintings back in their place, they would mysteriously float off the ground and be hung on the wall; except now hanging upside down. It has also been reported that campers staying in Cabin 13 have had to visit the camp medical facility after stepping on chards of glass scattered across the cabin rug. Could these be the same chards from Sam’s glasses? It seems as if the ghostly spirit of Sam is still running amok at Bay Cliff.

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Photo courtesy of Travel Marquette

Park Cemetery – Seventh Street
There are numerous ghost stories and hauntings that surround Park Cemetery on Seventh Street in Marquette, but one of the most shocking is one that relates to the haunting of the Old City Orphanage. People walking through the cemetery have noted a large hole in the ground near the grave site that was created for the boy in the Old City Orphanage that was beaten to death by the orphanage nun.

Oddly enough, it is around the same time that the hole in the ground is reported to the cemetery staff that sightings of the green glow in the Orphanage basement are also documented. Shortly after this phenomenon takes place in the cemetery and orphanage, the green glow disappears and the hole in the ground of the cemetery is neatly filled in and covered with flowers. From the looks of it, it seems as if the ghost of the beaten orphan is still restless and on the move today.

The Old Catholic Cemetery
Perched on the corner of Pioneer Road and Division Street in south Marquette sits a patch of woods where the old Catholic Cemetery used to be located. Sitting alongside of Pioneer Road and just tucked into the woods is a sign (pictured) describing a brief history of the cemetery and the story behind its relocation to Wright Street and the people still buried at the site.

Looking back at the history of this old cemetery, it has been recorded that this location became the burial place for numerous Marquette Catholics beginning in 1861. Due to a shortage of space, the area where the current Holy Cross Cemetery on Wright Street sits was purchased in the early 1900’s for further burials. What is interesting to note is that between the years of 1912 and 1925, nearly 165 Catholics buried in the Old Catholic Cemetery were transferred to Holy Cross Cemetery on Wright Street, but not every Catholic body was accounted for in this transition. One thing to consider is that geographic and topographic mapping at the time was much less accurate. Presumably, someone was buried, and, if you were lucky and could afford it, the cemetery staff would place a gravestone over your plot. Over time, all the gravestones were moved to the new location, but some of the bodies could not be found or retrieved and have since been left behind, still lying beneath the soil at the old Cemetery today.

It has been mentioned by residents of the trailer park across the street from the old Catholic Cemetery that the sounds of voices and screams of the bodies left behind can be heard when a strong southerly wind blows through the forest that has now overgrown the old burial sites. One could assume that the dead are looking for their loved ones who were taken from them nearly a century ago…

Have you been to any of these mysterious Upper Peninsula locations? Did you have paranormal encounter during your visit?

An Inside Look at Terror on Tillson: Michigan’s Largest Neighborhood Funded Halloween Experience

Year after year, visitors flock to a small neighborhood in Romeo, MI to experience Terror on Tillson, one of Michigan’s largest neighborhood funded Halloween attractions!  Today, guest blogger Vicki Lee, a 34-year resident of Tillson Street shares a behind the scenes look at what goes into creating this undeniably unique All Hallow’s Eve experience. 

Photo by KDMac Photography

Photo by KDMac Photography

It’s that time of the year again. A quaint street in the middle of the Historic Village of Romeo, Michigan, transforms from a street lined with majestic maple trees and Historic homes, dating back to the late 1800’s, into a haunted habitat. Once a typical Halloween, with a few scarecrows and some pumpkins and 350 trick-or-treaters, has now evolved into a Halloween Extravaganza!

Trick-or-treat numbers have risen to about 2,000. Tens of thousands of visitors wander down the street during the last two weeks of October just to get a sight of all the hard work these neighbors put in to make this a memorable experience. Terror on Tillson Street provides a safe, family oriented Halloween experience at zero cost to visitors. The elaborate displays will be mostly completed the weekend of October 24th, although everyone decorates right up until Halloween. Trick or treating is only on October 31st from 6-8pm, but visitors are welcome to stop by and take a gander at the devilish displays beforehand.

Photo by Heather Monaghan

Photo by Heather Monaghan

Tillson Street is a little more than two blocks long. Most people decorate in some form or another, but it is not a requirement when you move on the street (although many visitors think it is). Most of the time there are about 32 house that do some type of display. This is a neighborhood that plays together, works together and watches out for each other…that’s how it all works. Some of my favorite memories from Halloween on Tillson Street are the times that the neighbors spend time together like one big family. We wind down at the end of the evening and chat about the friendly visitors who strolled through and highlights from the night’s events.

Throughout each weekend in October, you will see many neighbors walking from house to house, as help is always needed for some props that are too hard to put up yourself. It is an ongoing preparation for the big finale on Halloween. The neighbors work at their own speed. As most Michiganders know, unpredictable weather always has a way of interfering with our set ups! Most of us have “real” jobs, so you hope you have good weather on the weekends to accomplish everything that needs to happen.  Some tweaking is always going on right up to the time Trick-or-treaters start to arrive.

Photo courtesy of Catherine Povinelli

Photo courtesy of Catherine Povinelli

We always include family and friends in the festivities, which they all look forward to each year. Their help is always much appreciated! At my house, we now have the 4th generation of helpers. My mom, who is 81, pretty much does the supervision role these days, but in a way she started this with me, I was born on Halloween and she always puts a little more effort in the decorations for my sake.

I continued this with my own children and it has just grown from there. As younger families moved on the street, the bigger our Halloween has become. The creativity of this neighborhood is amazing with the majority of decorations being handmade. Many residents work on their decorations throughout the year, hoping to finish before the next Halloween.

Photo courtesy of Catherine Povinelli

Photo courtesy of Catherine Povinelli

Everything is done by the residents of the street, their timeless hours and their enjoyment to do something very special for a free night out for the families is how this event has become what it is. We all hope everyone enjoys their visit to this one-of-a-kind neighborhood.

As my sons grew older and still wanted to be involved with the festivities, they created what is known as the “Bulldog Security” after Romeo High School’s mascot. Bulldog Security is a group of athletes from the high school that patrols the streets on Halloween night keeping an eye for trouble makers (not many to speak of) and lost children (maybe I should say lost parents). At one point these were just young teens wanting to be involved, now we have a few generations of athletes that help us out. Some of these young people come home from college just to be involved! The Village of Romeo has allowed Tillson Street to be blocked off on Halloween night for safety purposes during the 2 hour trick-or-treating time.

Photo courtesy of Catherine Povinelli

Photo courtesy of Catherine Povinelli

This year, Tillson Street has 3 special events that are included in our Halloween. One is the “Buzz Lee Memorial Scholarship Fund.” This was a fund that was started by my late husband with a golf outing to provide a vocational scholarship. When Buzz passed away from a brain tumor, my family and I decided to honor him in this wonderful scholarship that now provides not only a vocational scholarship, but also a pay-to-play scholarship and donations to the Wounded Warrior Project (Buzz was a Vietnam Veteran). We sell a limited edition “TILLSON STREET” Halloween shirt, hot cocoa and cider, can koozies and our very own Tillson Street Cookbook, put together by all the neighbors and friends. ALL proceeds go directly to the Scholarship Fund.

We also provide a special event for KKC, “Kids Kicking Cancer.” This will be our 5th year giving kids an afternoon of no worries and a huge amount of fun. We close the street for a couple of hours and the kids and their families come down the street to trick-or-treat. I’m really not sure who has more fun, my neighbors or the kids! This is an event that makes it all worth the hard we put in to the decorations! It has at times been a very emotional day for the neighborhood, but so, so rewarding!

Photo courtesy of Heather Monaghan

Photo courtesy of Heather Monaghan

If you’re planning to visit Tillson Street on Halloween this year, use these tips and information to make the most of your experience: 

-It’s best to walk and see everything, there will be bumper to bumper traffic, so it is very hard to see the displays in your vehicle.

-You never  have to wait in any line, although a line does seem to form during the evening, but that is not planned by anyone!

-Expect the walk to take you at least an hour to get through. There is parking on the street, but this usually hard to find.

-There are parking lots all around Tillson Street for a small donation, but are by no means associated with Tillson Street.

-Tillson Street is free of charge. The only things you might want to purchase are in the tent at 171 Tillson Street with all proceeds going to the scholarship fund.

Have you ever been to Halloween on Tillson Street? What did you think? 

A Ghoul’s Guide to Halloween 2014 in Pure Michigan

Halloween is nearly here! Whether you’re lost in a maze or getting scared at a haunt, there is plenty of Halloween fun happening across the state.  Here’s your guide to some ghoulishly fun (and family friendly!) Halloween events and attractions in Pure Michigan. Visit michigan.org full a full listing of Halloween events happening in October!

Corn Mazes are a fall staple in Michigan. Throughout the state, there’s winding paths with twists and turns that will test and confuse you as try to find the end. See below for some mazes to visit throughout the month of October!

BestMazeBestmaze Corn Maze– Williamston 
Every year, Bestmaze attempts to live up to its name. This year’s maze has a Castle & Dragon theme.  If you find your way out, there is a dragon you must defeat to exit the maze. (Remember there are towers so all you have to do is raise your hand if you need help!) Don’t let the theme fool you; this is a large maze designed for adults as well.

Amazing Acres Corn Maze – Edwardsburg
If you’re looking for fall family fun, make plans to visit the Amazing Acres Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch! The farm is over 90 acres and is packed with events for every member of the family, young or old. Explore the 14 acre corn maze with over 3.5 miles of paths. In addition to the corn maze itself, there are many other fun activities for the entire family at Amazing Acres that includes hayrides with horse-drawn and tractor-pulled, pumpkin patch, child-sized hay bale maze and more!

Houpt’s Corn Maze & Pumpkin Patch – Dundee
Houpt’s offers a two acre corn maze, haunted corn maze, ten acres of U-Pick pumpkins, a Gourd Slinger, Craft Barn, and fresh cider & donuts! Don’t miss the weekend hayrides and the popular our “Kid’s Weekend” held the third weekend of October every year.

corn-maze-at-bestmazeJacob’s Corn Maze – Traverse City 
Life sized corn mazes are fun for everyone, young and old alike. Experience a world class computer-designed 10 acre Corn Maze creation, unlike any other in Northern Michigan. Jacob’s Secret Agent Adventure is an exciting and fully interactive farm experience. It will captivate and entertain you and your family for hours with its twists and turns. Jacob’s Corn Maze is larger than 10 high school football fields with over five miles of trails!

Lewis Farm Market & Petting Farm – New Era
There’s something for everyone at the Lewis Farm Market & Petting Farm! Visit the largest petting farm in west Michigan with over 60 animals including some exotics. Outdoor family entertainment: jumping pillows, climbing toys, corn maze, wagon rides, pedal carts, barrel train, fruit cannons, pumpkin chucker, animated chicken show and even a bee observatory.

Westview Orchards & Adventure Farm – Washington Township
Head to Washington Township to experience a 188-acre award-winning sesquicentennial family farm and orchard. Westview offers a five acre corn maze, cider mill, petting barns, wagon rides and more!

Gull Meadow Farms – Richland
Stop at Gull Meadow for fall fun with a corn maze, apple orchard, pumpkin patch and wagon rides! When you find your way out of the maze, take a wagon ride to the U-pick apple orchard to find that perfect and healthy treat!

Haunted Houses have one purpose – to scare you! Although some haunted houses are more tailored to be family friendly, Michigan boasts some of the most terrifying haunts around. Read below for some hellacious haunted houses to visit this fall.

ErebusDinosaurErebus Haunted Attraction – Pontiac 
Erebus, the four-story Haunted House located in Pontiac, was entered into the Guinness Book of World Records as the World’s Largest Walk-through Haunted Attraction from Aug. 2005 – Sept. 2009. Erebus leads it’s victims through four stories of unique and terrifying paths with fear so intense some call it PAIN! Check out our Erebus blog to learn more – if you dare.

Niles Haunted House – Niles
The Niles Haunted House Scream Park has 44 acres of multiple haunted attractions, hayrides, games and concessions. It’s guaranteed to scare the YELL out of you. Check out their YouTube page for some extra frights!

Slaughtered at Sundown – Romeo 
This haunted house, located off a dirt road outside of society, adjacent to a corn field, is the perfect location for a haunted attraction. Enter a dark, winding illusion of decaying zombies, evil carnage, a spine chilling cemetery full of agony and torture.

Photo by Michelle Andonian Photography

Photo by Michelle Andonian Photography

Night Terrors – Ypsilanti
Beware! This is not your average haunted house! The acres of Wiard’s Orchards south of Ypsilanti Township are truly haunted. The history of these lands has lived in haunted houses of Michigan lore for centuries. Courageous souls who have dared to set foot on the haunted grounds of this old orchard say they can still hear the howling sounds of the night.

The Bone Yard – Stockbridge
Extreme haunted house, haunted woods, haunted corn maze, and haunted hayride. This attraction takes over an hour to enjoy and have the fear put into you. You’ll be led through twists and turns, terrified of what will come next. The Bone Yard is an indoor and outdoor event.

The Realm of Darkness – Pontiac
Realm of Darkness Haunted house is one of the scariest you can find! Manage your way through the horrors inside this house in an attempt to make your way out. Face the Wizard and get back double your admission price!

The Haunt

The Haunt – Grand Rapids
Welcome to your nightmare. The Haunt waits for you with a host of terror-filled experience in one 20,000 square-foot compound of fear. Chances are you’ll find your way out, but you won’t be the same. Holler your way through a half-mile of heart-pounding haunted hallways. Cringe through one horrifying theme after another. Stumble through Ghost Town, an outdoor maze in which your only guide is the moonlight. Dare to explore the shriek-inducing side attraction, “3-D Turmoil”. Not afraid of clowns? You will be.

Tee Lake Halloween – Lewiston
A Northern Michigan Haunted House & Halloween Attraction, Tee Lake Halloween offers three unique treats for Halloween fans & families. First, the Drive-Thru Haunt is a FREE, family friendly, self-guided tour through haunted displays. Tune your car radio to our spooky station to hear creepy music. No monsters will jump out at you. Second, Terror at Tee Lake is a terrifying walk-through haunted house open Oct. 25 and Nov. 1.Third, stay over in a haunted cabin – The Witch’s Cottage or Igor’s Hideaway.

For more Halloween-related events happening in Michigan, visit michigan.org. What are your favorite Halloween attractions? Share with us below!