From Our Fans: The Best of Fall in Pure Michigan

Fall in Michigan is short, but jam-packed with spectacular seasonal offerings! Earlier this month, we asked our fans to share their favorite fall foods, activities, and traditions.  We rounded up their responses to create an at-a-glance guide to experiencing fall in Pure Michigan. Take a look at some of the best of fall in the Mitten State according to our community. 

Michigan Apples

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Photo by Mary Van Arsdell

Dark chocolate covered caramel apple from Veni’s in Niles, MI. - Mary Van Arsdall

Koezes in Grand Rapids has locally grown apples hand dipped in house made caramel and rolled in cashew pieces. Only in October, delicious! - Joyce Winters

Michigan apples in an Apple Crisp recipe from Mackinac Island Dessert cookbook. Can’t get more Michigan than that! - Eric N Susan Murrell

Fall Flavors

Just had a Short’s Brewing Funkin Punkin keg for our wedding reception. Mmmmm good! Cheers to fall beers! - Adam Crall

Founders Harvest Ale. - Jan n’ Gary Dall

I made homemade apple fritters with Michigan maple syrup glaze! - Briana Herzog

Wasem Fruit Farm in Milan for great apples, maple glazed donuts & cider at a nice price.  - Jill S. 

Nothing is as fabulous as a cider mill donut, still hot enough for the outside to be almost crispy.  - Michele Cook Hayden

Love Blackstar Farms Late Harvest Riesling . It’s the best. can’t wait to visit.  - Sandy Westen

New Holland Brewing Icabod Pumpkin Ale.  - Kim Looman

Color Tours

Photo by Becky Pawloski Scholten

Photo by Becky Pawloski Scholten

Top of the lift ride at Boyne Mountain. Awesome views! - Lynn Jones

Went up to Leelanau, came back down M-37. Was very happy to have stopped at the scenic turnout/rest stop along the way. - Shelley Ferguson

Going to Oscoda. Taking the Fall Color Cruise on the AuSable. - Patrick Shaffer

My quick fall color tour is driving Edward Hines from Northville to Dearborn. - Lynn Plachetzki White

A fall drive to see the trees. When we lived in the Detroit area, we would take the drive through Hines Park. While living in the U.P., we always drove along Lake Superior, then to Tahquamenon Falls. - Joni Johnson

Cider Mills

Franklin Cider Mill! I’m not even a resident of Michigan and we make an annual trek to the “Cider Mecca!” - Karen Page

Opening Day at Dexter cider mill for fresh cider and warm donuts! Yum! - Angela Marshall ‏

Parmenters in Northville – THE BEST fresh cinnamon donuts!!! - Tracy Nafe

Uncle Johns, Spicers, Parshallville, Montrose Orchards…..love them all! - Nancy Miller

Pumpkin Patches

Cari Angell

Photo by Cari Angell

The charming Pumpkin Barn in Levering, MI.  - Cari Angell

Johnson’s Giant Pumpkin Farm in Saginaw, MI. They have a lot of activities for kids, a corn maze, crafts, food, pumpkin chucking with a trebuchet, animals to pet & feed. Always a great time for the family.  - Terri Garabelli

Vince and Joe’s Market on Garfield Rd. in Clinton and 25/Van Dyke Rd. in Shelby Twp. They have everything pumpkin for your Octoberfest.  - Vlasta Hallova Trulik

Andy T’s! See the monster weigh-off contenders and winners! - Andrew Eagle

Fall Festivals and Events

I love Fruit Ridge Hayrides! - Star Juarez

Applefest in Charlevoix! Love my Michigan! - Ruthann LaPorte Beyer

Farmer J’s world record corn mazes by Cabela’s in Dundee. – Jill S.

Art Prize is  awesome its a must see. - Shawn Sams

Joining in on the excitement of The Detroit Marathon is memorable for both participants and spectators.

Game Day Excitement

Photo by MMB Photography

Photo by MMB Photography

Eastern Market is always a stop for my daughter and I…what a great mix of the D at it’s best.  - Jules Ryan

Comerica Park – My favorite spot in all of the great state of Michigan!! - Lynn Friedenstab Becker

Ann Arbor and East Lansing are game day hot spots throughout the season!

Outdoor Exploration

Manitou Charter Fleet – With charter captain Bill Wright out of Leland. We learned many different ways to cook salmon! - Kevin Rogers

Hiking, biking, and off-roading on Michigan trails are a great way to experience fall colors.

Fall means the start of prime hunting season!

Halloween Fun

Spooky trails, Swartz Creek. - XTREMETALS

Halloween on Tillson Street – We’ll be going… It’s a Halloween must! And a sleepover for the grandchildren. - Donna Vehar

Junction Valley Railroad is entertaining enough for the whole family – and Handicap accessible! - Dan Miller

Family Traditions

Go horseback riding in the woods and listen to the sounds and look at the colors of autumn. - Brenda Shaw

Bon fires with good friends and some good wine! - Lynn Scraver

We take a trip to Mackinac Island and walk the trails. It is a quiet way to enjoy the beauty. - Cindy Howard Murphy

What’s on your “Best of Fall” list? 

Turkey Hunting in Michigan – A Short, But Successful Season

Today, guest blogger Jeff Helsdon from Ontario Out of Doors Magazine tells us about his experience hunting for turkey in Michigan this spring.

Turkey hunting in Michigan is a unique experience, not so much that the birds or terrain are drastically different, but the quality of the hunt is unique.

Going into the hunt, I had memories of a prior visit to Michigan and driving down the backroads and marveling at the numbers of turkeys and deer our family saw. My daughter and I played a game – who could count more out their side of the vehicle. The turkey numbers I saw during that visit are the most I’ve ever seen, and I hunted Missouri previously, which is rated as one of the top turkey-producers in the nation.

My expectations grew after I met Al Stewart, Michigan’s upland biologist, and former National Wild Turkey Federation state chairman Dan Potter, and we saw birds in strut driving into the hunt camp where we’d be staying. We hunted those birds in the morning, but didn’t have any luck calling them in shotgun range after morning fly-down.

We were just considering our next move when Al’s phone rang. Dan had spotted birds on the other side of the bush. After traveling across it and setting up, we weren’t in place long when a loud gobble rang out from beside us. Thinking the bird was down the hill and since I was facing the other direction, I turn slightly. Just then I see the bird move forward, clucking and unsure of what I was. The going-away shot was not a good one.

After moving, we again heard it gobble and managed to get it closer, but not in range.

During lunch Al explained the reasoning behind what I viewed as a complex system of multiple seasons and low bird limit. Although the season lasts five weeks, the license I had was only good for the first week on both private and public land. In total, there are four different seasons, five in total if the over-the-counter multi-area license is included.  The system involves applying for a license and is good for a specific area.

SX-Michigan-DNRAlthough more complex, the Michigan system works. The application system is also used to control hunter numbers on public land – of which Michigan has 10 million acres. Stewart demonstrated the well-planned out MiHunt online application that maps out the public land and cover types on each.

“Many times the public land is better than private land,” he said. “The beauty of public land is there are thousands of acres of it. If you’re on 80 acres of private land and the birds aren’t there, there’s nothing you can do.”

The Michigan limit is only one bird, something Stewart believes is key in maintaining the quality of the hunt.

“Hunter success is as good on the last day as opening day, give or take a per cent or two,” Stewart said. “Our goal in the spring hunt is to maximize opportunity and maintain high quality.”

After lunch, a chance encounter with a flock of jakes while we were scouting turned into a filled tag after some excellent calling.

For more information on turkey hunting in Michigan, visit the Michigan DNR and check out this video about turkey hunting on Beaver Island.

Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 12.47.56 PMJeff Helsdon is the turkey hunting editor of Ontario Out of Doors magazine and has completed the Canadian slam of turkey hunting as well as chasing gobblers in several states.

Cast Away the Winter Blues with Pure Michigan Hunting and Fishing

Today, native Michigander Derrek Sigler tells what he loves about  winter hunting and fishing in Pure Michigan.

I have to admit, I’m pretty spoiled living in Michigan year-round. I have friends in other states who have to travel to do this or that, whereas I have just about everything right outside my door—world-class fishing, hunting, and other outdoor activities. When winter grips the state, and some think its time to head south, I head outdoors, with fishing rod in hand.

We are blessed with roughly 8 million acres of public land in Michigan. Many rivers and streams wind through these lands and offer great opportunities to those willing to venture out. Come winter, two of my favorite things overlap—steelhead fishing and hunting season.

I spent most of my teenage years living near the Manistee River, near Brethren, Michigan. The river gets a strong run of salmon as summer fades and the clock rolls into fall. Behind that salmon run comes an annual migration, leading to some of the finest steelhead fishing to be found anywhere. These fish, looking to fatten up on salmon eggs, will hold in the river all winter long, awaiting their own time to spawn in the spring.

December is one of my favorite times to chase steelies, as the lower temperatures keep the traffic down on the water. There are usually a couple of days left in the month to hunt ducks, my other passion. The same temperatures that keep the fishermen away freeze the ponds and lakes, pushing the ducks to the rivers. This makes for a fun day of hunting ducks and catching fish.

The Manistee River winds through parts of the Huron-Manistee National Forest, which comprises almost a million acres of public land in the Lower Peninsula. There are countless fingers and tributaries along the lower river stretches, the perfect hiding places for ducks and geese. Before it opens into Manistee Lake and Lake Michigan, the final stretches of the river are bordered by state game area lands. It makes the Manistee River a paradise for anglers and hunters alike.

Drifting plugs or spawn in the deep holes and riffles can result in rod-bending action and a fight unlike any other experienced in fishing. During the winter months, leaves and ice can force you to pay close attention to your rods. When adding a little hunting into the mix, it can get a little trickier.  A spread of duck decoys can get cluttered up with a few sheets of skim ice that float down on really cold mornings. Still, it is often the only open water around and that can make for hot hunting.

Another species that makes for awesome late season river hunting is Michigan’s muzzleloader deer season, which always falls after the November firearm seasons. It’s not uncommon to see all kinds of wildlife floating down the river. I have likely seen more bucks from a float than from a treestand, so it makes sense to try the adventure of float hunting with a smoke pole.

The rules for float hunting in Michigan are pretty simple and follow common sense, too. Never get in the boat with a loaded firearm. If you are going to hunt, don’t load the gun until you’re at a complete stop with the motor off and anchored. I’ll hunt from the boat for waterfowl, but for everything else, get out of the boat.

Finding a big whitetail during the late muzzleloader season on the river is like stepping back in time. It’s not just the deer you look for while floating along. Look for fresh tracks, especially if there is a fresh layer of snow. It takes practice, but getting on the track of a buck is an amazing feat.

After the deer and duck seasons close, there are plenty of other opportunities for hunting and fishing along Michigan’s rivers during the winter months. Many small game seasons are open and then there’s another season for predators. Make sure you have the necessary licenses. During those deep freezes of winter, animals will gather near open water, and that will bring in the predators. Floating along and stopping to set up occasionally will allow you to cover a lot of land, and not wear yourself out trudging through a lot of snow.

When the weather outside is frightful, Michigan’s 36,000 miles of rivers and streams make a delightful place to cast away winter blues and have a blast hunting and fishing for those willing to go. The state may be known as the Great Lake State, but the rivers and moving waterways can make for some Pure Michigan winter fun!

Derrek Sigler is a native Michigander who grew up hunting, fishing, and enjoying the outdoors in the Northwest part of the Lower Peninsula. He writes for Hard Core Brands and OutdoorHub about hunting, fishing, and outdoor sports.