Unique Michigan Destinations for Budget-Savvy Travelers

Michigan is filled with top-rated destinations and attractions, both indoors and out. From museums and zoos to historical sites and national parks; from city markets and fantastic eateries to Rail Trails and beaches. Michigan is well-known for it’s scenic beauty, small towns, and fun cities. And the best part is that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to enjoy what Michigan has to offer. All it costs you is time, and spending time at these Michigan treasures is time well spent.

Read more on some low-cost things to do in the Great Lakes state, courtesy of The Awesome Mitten’s Jackie Mitchell.

Visit a National or State Park

Michigan is home to one national park (Isle Royale), two national lakeshores (Sleeping Bear Dunes and Pictured Rocks), and over 100 state parks. In fact, you are never more than half an hour from a state park, forest campground, or trail system for hiking or biking in Michigan. You can access most of the national lakeshores for free. Climb a dune, explore trails, hike to a waterfall or lighthouse, or spend the day on a beach. The annual $11 Recreation Passport for your vehicle will gain you entrance into the entire state park system where even more trails, dunes, waterfalls, and beaches await. Camping is a nominal nightly fee in any of the national or state parks. Many parks also offer free interpretive talks, children’s activities, and a variety of programs.

Tahquamenon Falls State Park is a must-see for residents and visitors alike

Photo Courtesy of Alex Beaton and The Awesome Mitten

Go to a Drive-In Movie

There are 10 drive-in movie theaters in Michigan, scattered all around the lower peninsula. In the heyday of the 1950s, there were over 100 drive-in theaters in Michigan. While only a few remain, they are again growing in popularity. With arcades, putt-putt golf, playgrounds, and a picnic-like atmosphere, what better way to spend a Friday or Saturday night with family or friends than taking in a couple movies the old fashioned way? Ticket prices are similar to regular movie prices, but the double-feature makes a drive-in a deal for movie-goers. Danny Boy’s Drive In, Michigan’s newest theater that opened in 2012, offers a $20 carload special, for up to 6 people, and a $5 food ticket that allows you to bring in your own food and drink.

Take a step back in time and enjoy a drive-in movie

Photo Courtesy of Danny Boy’s Drive-In

Heidelberg Project

Started in 1986 as a response to blight affecting his neighborhood, Detroit-native artist Tyree Guyton began turning his childhood home on Heidelberg Street into a work of found-object art. Now stretching over the entire city block, Guyton, community residents, and other artists have turned abandoned houses, vacant lots, and even the streets themselves into a provocative community art project that hosts over 270,000 visitors a year. Facing skepticism and legal issues with the city from the beginning, the Heidelberg Project has evolved into a landmark of Detroit, winning numerous awards and revitalizing the local economy. Despite its grassroots popularity, the Heidelberg Project as it currently exists will be dismantled over the next few years. If you haven’t yet experienced the Heidelberg Project, now is the time. Organized tours have a fee, but just visiting the area is free.

Be a Lighthouse Keeper

Michigan’s lighthouses are iconic. If you’ve ever been to the shore of one of our Great Lakes, chances are you have a picture of a lighthouse, standing guard against the storms of Michigan’s inland seas. You might have even imagined you were the keeper of the light, living romantically at the edge of sand and surf. What you may not know is that it’s possible at one of the twenty lighthouses available with accommodations in Michigan. Four lighthouses are bed and breakfasts, five are vacation rentals, five offer couples or families the chance to be keeper for a fee (only a few hundred for a week or two), and six are available through a volunteer application. A listing of operational lighthouses and information can be found at the US Lighthouse Society website.

The Round Island Light House is as picturesque as any spot in Michigan

Photo Courtesy of Alex Beaton and The Awesome Mitten

Visit a Ghost Town

Dozens of abandoned towns dot Michigan’s landscape. Many are in the Upper Peninsula, where the copper and logging industries once boomed, causing towns to rise up around mills and mines. When they resources ran out, the towns were left to ruin. Today, only a few foundations or headstones might mark the place where a town once stood. Sometimes the structures are preserved. The largest abandoned town is Fayette, which is now preserved along the shores of Lake Michigan in the Upper Peninsula at Fayette Historic State Park . Entrance to the park is free with a Recreation Passport.

Are you brave enough to visit a Michigan ghost town?

Photo Courtesy of Fayette Historic Park

What Michigan treasures do you enjoy without spending a lot of money?

Jackie Mitchell writes for Awesome Mitten and works at Michigan State University. She enjoys hiking, kayaking, and camping with her family in any Michigan State Park.

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