Keep These Tips for Recycling in Mind While Traveling in Pure Michigan

Unspoiled natural beauty and pristine forests and lakes make enjoying the great outdoors in Michigan so special. Today, guest blogger Kerrin O’Brien from Michigan Recycling Coalition shares some best practices for recycling while traveling in Michigan. 

Recycle, MI Sleepy Hollow

Photo courtesy of Michigan Recycling Coalition

So, the great Michigan outdoors beacons you to come play?  What drew you?  The amazing fresh water beaches?  Picturesque sand dunes?  Sublime, cool forests?  Or, the rustic and modern places where friends come to eat, drink and be merry?  Whatever your reason for traveling in and around Michigan, take notice of these places.  Do you see litter? Can you find a trash can or better yet, where’s the recycling bin?

What you don’t see in the water, on the beach or in the forest is a big part of what makes Michigan pure.  We care about our peninsulas and it shows.  Michiganders take great pride in the beauty of our state.

As a kid, my family went camping a lot. It’s what young families did in the 1970’s. One camping trip to the Great Smokey Mountains in Kentucky left a big impression on me. Sadly, it wasn’t the beauty of the mountains but the trash dumped off the side of a cliff that left its mark. We never encountered this kind of thoughtlessness on such a grand scale in Michigan. My family spent a day cleaning up that hillside.

Photo courtesy of Michigan Recycling Coalition

Photo courtesy of Michigan Recycling Coalition

Now when my family goes camping, we think about leaving no trace long before we’re in place.  You won’t always have ready access to convenient garbage cans, let alone recycling bins, so it’s important to consider your options before you don’t have them.  We try to make smart choices about the products and packaging we buy before we’re in the woods or at the beach.

Recycling wasn’t yet a big thing in the 1970’s, but neither was complex plastic packaging.  Think about reducing your waste when you’re buying.  Purchasing products sold in minimal, smart, and recyclable packaging will reduce your waste burden and bill.  Recycling, wherever you find yourself, is an important part of the commitment and unfortunately, not always easy.

ReMi_4C_TMGovernor Rick Snyder recently made recycling a priority for Michigan.  We now know that providing Michiganders and visitors with recycling options wherever they go is an important part of keeping Michigan clean and green.  The environmental benefits of recycling are probably clear to many of us, turning our garbage into back into new products puts our garbage to work for us and conserves our resources.  But you know what else recycling does?  It creates jobs and local economic activity that doesn’t involve digging for new resources.

So, on your travels this summer, look for ways to reduce your waste in the first place, choose recyclable products and packaging, buy in bulk, look for or ask for recycling bins wherever you go, pack out your recyclables and feel confident that you’re playing your part in Pure Michigan.

How do you recycle while traveling? 

KerrinKerrin O’Brien has been involved in recycling on a professional level for more than 20 years and Executive Director of the Michigan Recycling Coalition since 2008.  O’Brien’s experience in the Smokey Mountains so long ago gave her the passion and purpose to make a career of reducing waste.  The Michigan Recycling Coalition is an association for recycling professionals and statewide advocate for best practices and policies in recycling. Their Recycle, MI campaign aims at raising awareness of the value of recycling for communities across the state.

 

15 Things to Pack on Your Pure Michigan Camping Trip: An Infographic

Michigan Camping and RV Month might be coming to a close, but there’s still plenty of time to plan a Pure Michigan camping trip this summer! And with more than a thousand campgrounds statewide, there’s something for everyone – whether it’s camping along rivers, lakes, sand dunes and beaches or in state parks or national forests.

To help you prepare for your next camping trip in Michigan, we’ve put together this checklist of things to bring. See the image below and click here to download a full-sized version. For more on camping in Michigan, visit michigan.org.

Serene Walk-in Campgrounds in Pure Michigan

Jim DuFresne, author of more than 20 guidebooks and main contributor to www.MichiganTrailMaps.com is a go-to resource for all things hiking and trail-related in Michigan. Today, he fills us in on some of the incredible walk-in campsites around the state.

Sometimes it seems like you have to drive to the end of the road to escape the summer crowds and find a quiet place to camp.

And sometimes all you have to do is walk 100 feet.

When the National Park Service renovated its Platte River Campground in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in 1991 it installed electrical hook-ups in 96 of the 179 sites, a change in previous NPS policy of rustic-only campgrounds. But the designers also added 25 walk-in sites for tent campers where a short stroll leads to a quick escape from this otherwise popular and busy campground.

A couple of the walk-in sites are less than 30 yards from where you leave the car and but the majority are a longer walk through the low wooded dunes. Each is unique; site B-8 occupies the top of knoll, B-5 overlooks a pond filled with cattails and wild irises.

The Platte River sites can be reserved in advance through recreation.gov, but the beauty of walk-in sites is that they are often available the day you arrive.

Platte River Campground isn’t the only place offering sites to campers willing to walk. Here are some others:

Shelley Lake
This dispersed recreation area in the Huron-Manistee National Forests is north of White Cloud and has eight designated sites spread around the shoreline of this scenic, 15-acre lake of which seven are reached after a short walk of a 50 yards or less. Site Number 3 is located on a point in the southwest corner of the lake where you can pitch your tent with a 180-degree view of the water.           

Wakeley Lake
Wakeley Lake Foot Travel Area is east of Grayling in the Huron-Manistee National Forests and is best known for its catch-and-release fishery that produces six-pound bass and foot-long bluegills. But the 2,000-acre tract also has a walk-in campground and 30 miles of two-tracks that has become a playground for hikers and mountain bikers. The hike from M-72 to the campground is a third of a mile and the four sites are located in a stand of red pine on a low hill overlooking the lake. Two of them have picnic tables and fire rings.

Tubbs Lake Island
Located in Tubbs Lake State Forest Campground, this small island, created when Winchester Dam was built in the late 1950′s to create a waterfowl habitat, is a Mecosta County Park reached by driving across a narrow dike. The campground features 12 sites including two walk-in sites. These sites are located at the top of the island in a semi-open area that commands a great view of the surrounding lakes as well as your neighbors below.

Pete’s Lake
Located south of Munising in the Hiawatha National Forest, Pete’s Lake Recreation Area has 41 rustic sites, including two for walk-in campers. Site Number 7A is a 50-yard stroll from a trailhead at the east end of the campground and features a clear view of the lake. Less than a quarter mile further is Site Number 8A, another shoreline site with even a bit of sandy beach in front of it.   

Find more campsites around the state at michigan.org and let us know if you have a camping trip planned for this summer!

Jim DuFresne is the author of more than 20 guidebooks and the main contributor to www.MichiganTrailMaps.com, a resource web site for hikers, backpackers, cross-country skiers and other trail users. Among his titles are Michigan’s Best Campgrounds and Isle Royale National Park: Foot Trails & Water Routes.