How to Reel in a Salmon or Steelhead in Pure Michigan This Fall

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Salmon and steelhead are ready to bite! Fall is a great time to get out on the water and reel in a big one. Today, Elyse Walter from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources shares some tips and techniques for making a big catch in Michigan this fall. 

Michigan offers some fantastic fishing during the fall months – particularly for salmon and steelhead. In fact, now can be the perfect time to target them, if you know where to go and what techniques to use. Whether you’re looking for the various salmon species or steelhead (rainbow trout that are stocked in a river) you’re sure to find plenty of opportunities this month and beyond!

Atlantic Salmon
Fishing for Atlantic salmon is huge on the St. Marys River; in fact this spot is considered the best recreational Atlantic salmon fishery west of the East Coast. Most anglers troll for this species using downriggers, but other popular methods are fly fishing for them with wet flies or spin fishing for them with plugs, spinners and spoons.

DSK329 023 - girl charterChinook Salmon
These fish are often called “kings” and with good reason! Popular spots to target them in the fall include Great Lakes piers, streams along the Lake Michigan coast, or inland streams such as the Manistee (Tippy Dam), Pere Marquette and St. Joseph rivers. Many anglers focus on low-light time periods – such as in the morning or in the evening – but others target Chinooks after dark with glow-in-the-dark spoons. Artificial bait is what most anglers use to appeal to this species, but salmon eggs are popular as well.

Coho Salmon
This popular species can be caught in Lake Michigan at any time, though some of the best fishing happens in early fall. In particular, the Manistee River is very popular in late October and in the Upper Peninsula the Anna River is a great destination for this salmon. Lots of anglers use spinners, spoons and plugs when fishing for this species.

DSK265 65 - steelheadSteelhead
Michigan is considered one of the best steelhead fishing destinations in the country with several well-known spots located throughout the state. These include the Manistee, Muskegon and St. Joseph rivers in the Lake Michigan watershed, the Au Sable River in the Lake Huron watershed, and the Huron River in the Lake Erie watershed. Most anglers head out in November and/or December (if they’re not hunting) to target steelhead and use a variety of techniques to do so – including spinners, plugs and single salmon eggs floating under a bobber.

Don’t miss your chance to catch a big salmon or steelhead this fall. For even more information on fishing in Michigan, including rules and regulations, visit www.michigan.gov/fishing. 

Where is your go-to destination for fall fishing in Michigan? 

Elyse-Walter-150x1501Elyse Walter is a communication specialist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. She specifically works with the DNR’s Fisheries Division to help educate and promote the state’s fishing opportunities and aquatic resources.

A Grouse Hunter’s Guide To Navigating Michigan’s Seven New GEMS

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Grouse hunting season in Michigan is open now through November 14th. Today, guest blogger Katie Keen from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources tells us about a new program that’s giving Michigan hunters access to some of the top grouse hunting areas in the country.

Daylight is starting to give us the squeeze, and if you’re like me, you’re starting to smell fall in the air.

Fall brings prime hunting season in Michigan, and with it a new program that the DNR and many other groups – like the Ruffed Grouse Society, U.S. Forest Service, National Wild Turkey Federation and Ducks Unlimited – are really excited about.

It’s called GEMS, or Grouse Enhanced Management Systems.

Michigan is among the leading states in the nation for grouse hunting, and the GEMS showcase seven great areas for those who want to give the sport a try or maybe existing hunters looking for new locations. The great thing about grouse hunting is, if you’re already a hunter you have – or will soon have, with deer season right around the corner – the hunting license you need.  The base license serves as a small game license, which is all you need for grouse hunting. The base license provides critical funding for wildlife and habitat management and conservation officers, and also to educate the public on the benefits of hunting, fishing and trapping.

Info kioskSeven GEMS are ready for this year’s grouse season, which starts Sept. 15.  Go online and pick out the first GEMS site you want to visit, whether it’s just below the bridge in Indian River, just north of the tri-cities near Standish, or north of the bridge where you could go from Drummond Island in the eastern U.P. to the Ottawa National Forest in the far western U.P.  The adventure is there and waiting!  You’ll also notice, when you’re on the GEMS website, the local support area businesses are giving GEMS. GEMS hunters will receive some great discounts by taking a selfie at a GEMS site and showing the picture to the participating business.

Once you’ve picked out your first GEMS location, and arrived there with your fashionable hunter orange vest, you’ll find some very useful information. Learn about ruffed grouse biology and how forests are managed for wildlife through cutting, hear examples of a ruffed grouse drumming on a log, and – most importantly – check out the map that will show you the miles and miles of hunter walking trails waiting for you.

Screen Shot 2014-09-15 at 5.10.49 PMGEMS areas feature non-motorized trails planted with clover weaving through pockets of grouse’s favorite habitat – stands of young aspen trees. You can choose to stay on the trail looking for grouse, or step off a bit and venture through the stands of young timber.  And don’t forget the other great upland game bird that can be found and hunted in these GEMS – the American woodcock.  Woodcock season starts on Sept. 20, and since it is a migratory bird, an additional free “woodcock stamp” is needed for hunting.  You can grab a woodcock stamp anywhere DNR licenses are sold or online.

Once you’ve completed your first GEMS hunt, make sure to take that selfie in front of a GEMS sign and visit one of the area businesses to get a great discount.  Hunters in Michigan bring millions of dollars into our economy … and have a whole lot of fun doing it!

Katie KeenKatie Keen is a wildlife outreach technician for the DNR in Cadillac, who spends her working hours with hunters, landowners, educators and media representatives to help with their DNR-related needs. In her off-time, she is a hunting-landowner who loves to educate folks about the DNR.

 

 

A Peek Inside Jackson County’s Historic Mann House

Today, guest blogger Mary Dettloff from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources gives us a quick look inside Jackson County’s historic Mann House.

The Mann House, Concord Michigan.

Photo courtesy of Michigan Historical Museum

The historic Mann House in the small farming community of Concord in Jackson County recently was repainted to more accurately reflect the Victorian-era paint scheme it likely had, but that’s not all that’s new at the house.

A recent partnership between the Michigan Historical Center (MHC) and Eastern Michigan University’s historical preservation program now places three graduate students at the state historic site each summer to operate and maintain it. The students also perform research there in between greeting visitors and giving interpretive tours.

The partnership is a boon for the MHC because it provides fresh insights and research on the property, and EMU benefits by providing students with the opportunity to have hands-on experience operating a historic site that is really a small museum.

The Mann House, Concord Michigan.

Photo courtesy of Michigan Historical Museum

The house, built in 1883 by Daniel and Ellen Mann, is a near-perfectly preserved Victorian-era home. The Manns’ two daughters, Mary Ida and Jessie Ellen, were taught to value education and life-long learning, which ultimately led them to preserve their family’s nearly unaltered home and its furnishings. Visitors touring the house today are immersed in the family life and Victorian culture that shaped this pair of independent women.

Last summer, the graduate students from EMU who worked at the Mann House did research on the Mann family and the community of Concord, and developed a new house tour for visitors. Among the things they learned were that sisters Mary Ida and Jessie Ellen were ahead of their time when it came to being independent women.

Ellen Mann and her daughters all graduated from Michigan State Normal School (now EMU), which was unusual for the time. The Mann sisters traveled the world – throughout the United States, Europe and Asia – before it was common for women to travel alone. Several items that they acquired on their world travels are on display in the Mann House today. Also on display are some vintage clothing, items from the 1840s that belonged to Daniel and Ellen Mann’s parents, furniture from the 1870s the couple acquired when they married in 1873 and furnishings from the mid-1880s when they moved into the house.

The Mann House, Concord Michigan.

Photo courtesy of Michigan Historical Museum

This summer, the EMU fellows working at the site will continue researching the community, the house and the family who lived there. One student is focusing on gardening and foods of the late 19th and early 20th century. Another is looking at various modes of transportation available in Concord at the time the family lived there. A third student is returning for her second summer at the Mann House, and is continuing her research on the lives of Jessie and Mary Ida Mann to introduce more aspects of the sisters into the house.

The Mann House is located at 205 Hanover St. in Concord. Admission is free, and visitors should know that the Mann House is not a universally accessible site. The Mann House is open Thursdays through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Aug. 31. Visitors should allow about one hour to tour the house, grounds and carriage house.

Mary Dettloff is a northern Michigan native and currently works as a senior communications advisor for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.