Win a Pure Michigan Snow Days Getaway with Lands’ End and Boyne Highlands

Fall is in the air, but the forecast is in and the Farmers Almanac predicts that snowy days are just around the corner. In anticipation of our impending winter wonderland, Pure Michigan has teamed up with Lands’ End to offer fans across the nation the chance to win an ultimate winter getaway at Boyne Highlands Resort.

Photo courtesy of Boyne Highlands

Photo courtesy of Boyne Highlands

Lands’ End recently conducted a Snow Days survey of more than 1,000 people and found nearly 80 percent of adults are just excited to enjoy a snow day as their kids. Home to 6,500 miles of snowmobile trails, 3,000 miles of cross country skiing trails and endless terrain for snowshoeing, there’s no better place to experience the thrill of a snow day than Pure Michigan.

Those are just a few of the activities that the winner of the Snow Days Getaway Sweepstakes will have an opportunity to enjoy at Boyne Highlands Resort – one of Michigan’s premiere all-season family resorts. The winner and up to four guests will also be able to hit the 55 downhill ski runs at Boyne and experience the adrenaline rush of winter ziplining. When it’s time to warm up, full service spa treatments and the nearby indoor water park at Boyne Mountain are the perfect break from the weather.

LANDS' END LOGONo snow day would be complete without the right winter gear, so Lands’ End is including a $1,000 gift card to outfit the winner’s Pure Michigan adventure.

Visit www.landsend.com/snowdays to enter and for official rules. Contest ends November 14, 2014.

Three Reasons to Ski and Snowboard in Pure Michigan this Spring

Today, Mickey MacWilliams of Michigan Snowsports Industries Association (MSIA) gives us some great reasons to hit the slopes in Pure Michigan before the snow melts and spring is in full bloom. 

Snowboarders_basin_stIt may be hard for some to believe, but there are many of us who love winter and hate to see it go.  Spring is my favorite time of the year to ski. Here are three reasons to take advantage of prime ski and snowboard conditions this spring:

Longer Days, Softer Snow. The days are longer, the lift lines short, the sun is high in the sky, and the snow is soft. Springtime makes for some ideal skiing and snowboarding conditions!

Great Discounts. Ski areas offer discount rates to get people on the slopes one last time.  Just about every ski area in the state has some sort of spring carnival with special reduced lift tickets or lodging rates.

ShantyCreek2011Winter0414Spring Carnivals and Silly Events. Spring carnivals with ski races across man-made ponds, costume contests, beer tents, silly slalom races and other events abound.

Spring is the time to “ski” Michigan, not “flee” Michigan! Due to Michigan’s record snowfall, cool temperatures and efficient snowmaking capabilities, many ski areas plan to remain open through the end of March, and some will stay open through April 13 or later, so that families can take advantage of Michigan’s ski slopes and trails during spring break.

BOYNEMT_5613If you want to know where to find the snow, check out our website, goskimichigan.com and click on the “Events & Discounts” button, which is updated frequently.  We provide a running list of special events, packages and discounts at ski areas all across Michigan.  Easy links to Michigan ski area websites and snow conditions are also available from that site.  Although some Michigan ski areas stay open into April, I recommend that skiers and riders visit our website or call the ski area they plan to visit prior to arrival, since some may have limited hours of operation.

Winter recreation accounts for nearly a third of the state’s $17.7 billion-a year Michigan travel industry. I believe that this is a testament to the many, many skiers and snowboarders who cherish Michigan’s winter and hate to see it melt away. (And just like the Ice Queen in Disney’s movie Frozen, “The cold never bothered me anyway!”)

Screen-Shot-2013-11-25-at-4.57.24-PM-150x150Mickey MacWilliams is the executive director of the Michigan Snowsports Industries Association, which represents the ski and snowboard industry in our state.  She is also the current president of TICOM, (Tourism Industry Coalition of Michigan) an avid downhill and cross-country skier and a very timid but enthusiastic snowboarder.  You can reach her at info@goskimichigan.com

Slopes and Trails Abound in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

With all the winter weather we’ve had lately, it’s the perfect time to plan a ski trip in Pure Michigan! Mickey MacWilliams from the Michigan Snowsports Industries Association gives us an overview of some spectacular Upper Peninsula ski slopes to check out this season. 

Powder glade skiing, uncrowded lift lines, ski jumping, scenic trails and terrain parks for every skier ability level, comfortable accommodations, ski jumping and lift ticket rates that are at least half the price of those in the Rockies.  If this sounds too good to be true, then you haven’t skied Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Although the U.P. might not immediately come to mind when thinking about skiing, the area actually has a long and colorful ski history.  At the latter part of the 19th century and early 20th century, ski jumping was the primary form of competitive skiing in the country and the Upper Peninsula was a key center, hosting one of the most popular ski jumping tournaments at that time.

Touring the Upper Peninsula’s ski areas is a fun and relatively inexpensive way to take a ski vacation.  For this article, our trip begins in Marquette and heads west from there, stopping at nine ski areas along the way.

Taking a leap at Marquette Mountain

Home to Northern Michigan University, Marquette is a picturesque town along the shore of Lake Superior.  Marquette Mountain is just a few miles out of town and although the ski area doesn’t have on-site lodging, they partner with local hotels to provide packages for as little as $55 per night.  Marquette Mountain is a large Midwest ski area, with 169 skiable acres, 25 runs, a 600 foot vertical drop and trails up to 1 ¼ mile in length. The day lodge is comfortable and there are slopes for all ability levels. Marquette Mountain’s website has a “Special Rates” page that lists discounts that change as the season progresses.

Heading west from Marquette on US 41, a stop at the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame is definitely worthwhile.  Located in Ishpeming, about 10 miles west of Marquette, the Hall of Fame is home to the world’s largest skiing museum.

The view from Mont Ripley, overlooking the cities of Houghton and Hancock

Next stop is Mont Ripley in Houghton.  The ski area picturesquely sits on the Portage Lake Canal, which separates the cities of Houghton and Hancock.  From the top of Mont Ripley, the view of the canal and the cities below is breathtaking.  A popular destination for Michigan Tech students, Mont Ripley features 25 runs of all ability levels.  NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center keeps track of annual snowfall and listed Hancock Michigan as the third snowiest city in the United States (behind Crested Butte, Colorado and Valdez, Alaska) with an annual average of 215.8 inches of snow. Like Marquette Mountain, there is no on-site lodging at Mont Ripley, but accommodations are available in Houghton and Hancock.

Heading north from the Houghton/Hancock area on US 41 takes one up the Keweenaw Peninsula, where the snow doesn’t ever seem to stop and the mountains get higher with each mile traveled.  Close to the tip of the peninsula is Mount Bohemia, an expert-only ski area.  MSN.com has called Mount Bohemia “one of the top ten undiscovered ski resorts in the world” for a reason.  The lift lines are short; there are over 500 acres of skiable terrain, a 900-foot vertical drop and powder skiing most of the winter. This hidden secret is a true treasure for backcountry skiers and riders. The average snowfall in Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula is 273 inches. The lake effect snow is dry, similar to the conditions in the Rockies, and accumulates as powder which is untouched because Mount Bohemia’s slopes are never groomed.  Mount Bohemia offers on-site accommodations that include hostel beds for $25 per night, heated yurts that can sleep up to 10, trailside cabins and The Inn on Lac Labelle that includes breakfast and dinner.

The Yurts at the base of Mount Bohemia provide cozy shelter for the night.

Once you’ve had your fill of the steep and the deep, the western side of the U.P. offers a variety of recreational options that fit all ability levels and price ranges.  Taking in the beauty of the Upper Peninsula on snowshoes or cross-country skis is a must and Porcupine Mountains State Park near Ontonagon offers thousands of acres of snow-covered backcountry wilderness to explore. Four main and several smaller cross-country ski trails combine to form a 42 KM Nordic Trail System through the unspoiled beauty of the state park. The trails feature two warming shelters and are power-tilled and groomed daily. As a bonus, a trail pass includes use of the downhill ski chairlifts, giving skiers quick access to the heart of the Nordic Trail system, as well as the entire Alpine Ski area.

After a day of state-park beauty, it’s time to enjoy some comfortable accommodations in preparation for skiing in Big Snow Country.  The western border of the U.P. is called that for a reason.  The town of Bessemer, which is in the heart of this area, registers in at 210 inches of snow annually.

Lodging options abound at Big Powderhorn Mountain Resort in Bessemer.  Its location provides easy access not only to Big Powderhorn, but also to Black Jack Ski Area, Indianhead Mountain and Mt. Zion.  Sporting a new lodge built two years ago, Big Powderhorn provides accommodations from, modest to luxury, in chalets and condominiums at the base of the slopes.  Big Powderhorn Mountain offers 33 downhill trails with a 622 vertical drop.  There are 9 double chairlifts and a beginner hand tow to get you around the 253 acres of skiable terrain.  There is something here for every ski ability level, with 35% novice runs, 35% considered more difficult, and 30% expert.

A couple of miles away is Black Jack Resort with its family-friendly atmosphere.  Black Jack has 24 slopes on 126 skiable acres serviced by four double chairs, a rope tow and a handle tow.  Looking to make skiing affordable to families, kids 12 and under ski free with a paid adult lift ticket, plus discounts for military personnel and college students, and ski slopes and terrain parks for every level make Black Jack a fun and affordable place for all.

Mt. Zion, operated by Gogebic Community College, provides affordable winter recreation for everyone.  With 10 slopes and free cross-country ski trails, a snow tubing park, a 300’ vertical drop, free skiing for Gogebic Community College students and senior citizens 62 and over, the slopes are a popular place for the local community. Adult full-day lift tickets are priced at just $20, making Mt. Zion one of the least expensive areas to ski at in the state.

Also located in Big Snow Country is Indianhead Mountain.  Voted Visitor’s Choice Favorite Family Friendly in 2011 and Best Terrain in 2012 by OnTheSnow.com, Indianhead has been a favorite of many families for generations.  With a 638 vertical food drip and 30 runs over 230 acres serviced by 9 lifts and tows, there is plenty to explore.  Fifty percent of Indianhead’s runs are considered expert terrain, but there are also 10 intermediate runs and five for beginners.  Indianhead also has two terrain parks so there really is something for everyone.  Indianhead’s comfortable lodge is at the top of the mountain, and lodging is available in Mountain Top Hotel Rooms, Mountain Top Village Chalets and Trailside Condos.  Dining options range from cafeteria cuisine to The Lodge, which is considered one of the region’s quality restaurants.

Leaving Big Snow Country and heading south along the Michigan/Wisconsin border, brings one to Ski Brule in Iron River.  Ski Brule prides itself as being the first ski area in Michigan to open for the season and the last to close.  A favorite of many, for the sixth consecutive year Ski Brule was voted the Midwest’s Overall Favorite Ski & Snowboard Resort at OnTheSnow.com.  With 17 trails, 11 lifts (five chairlifts, two T-bars, three rope tows, one paddle tow), 150 acres of terrain, 500 vertical feet, three terrain parks, two terrain trails and cross-country ski trails that wind around the slopes and down to the Brule River, the whole family can easily find recreational options to suit their needs.   Affordable on-site lodging in chalets and condominiums is available and since Ski Brule is usually open for skiing six months out of the year, a return trip in April – or maybe even May – is always a possibility.

The final destination on our U.P. ski loop is Pine Mountain, which features 27 runs, serviced by three lifts and two surface tows.  Night skiing is available Wednesday through Saturday.   Pine Mountain offers three terrain parks including beginner, intermediate and advanced parks for all levels of skiers and riders to enjoy.  All terrain parks are accessible from the triple lift and all are hittable in one run. In addition to the downhill skiing options, Pine Mountain also has a ski jump! Every year The Kiwanis Ski Club hosts one of the most popular jumping tournament in the United States. Top jumpers from around the world make their way to Pine Mountain to partake in this historic annual event. With an attendance of over 20,000 spectators and tailgaters flocking to the resort for the competition, Jump Weekend is truly a unique experience.  This year Jump Weekend is scheduled for February 6 – 9. Pine Mountain offers a variety of room accommodations in their lodge at the base of the slopes, as well as slope-side condominium units to suit both short-term and long-term stays.

To experience all that Michigan’s Upper Peninsula has to offer, a weeklong trip is recommended.  However, if you don’t have time to do it all, that’s okay.  Fun can be had whenever you visit.  For more information on Michigan ski areas, go to goskimichigan.com and click on the Ski Areas & Conditions button.

Have you been skiing in the Upper Peninsula? Where did you go? 

Mickey MacWilliams is the executive director of the Michigan Snowsports Industries Association, which represents the ski and snowboard industry in our state.  She is an avid downhill and cross-country skier and a very timid but enthusiastic snowboarder.  You can reach her at info@goskimichigan.com.