10 Michigan Snowboarding Facts to Know Before You Hit the Slopes

 The snowboarding season has arrived, and whether you’re planning on shredding the ‘gnar, carving up black diamonds or just going down your first bunny hill, you know that the Great Lakes State has some of the most exciting and diverse terrain in the Midwest.

Photo courtesy of iEnvision Photo

Photo courtesy of iEnvision Photo

We’ve put together a list of 10 snowboarding facts you should know if you want to stay crunchy – or “cool” to all of you non-boarding folk. So drop in and read below to see if you’re up to snuff on these snowboarding fun facts.

1. Muskegon, Michigan is noted as the birthplace of modern snowboarding. In 1965, Sherman Poppen, an engineer, invented a toy for his daughters by tying two skis together and attaching a rope to one end so they would be able to steer as they stood on the board and glided downhill. Poppen’s invention was known as the “snurfer”, a combination of snow and surf.

2. In 2000, Snowboarding was the fastest-growing sport in the United States, with the number of boarders rising to a total of just over 7.2 million. In 2013, in the Midwest alone, 7.1 million snowboarding enthusiasts dropped in on hills and grinded on rails and boxes.

3. Snowboarding was first included in the winter Olympics in 1998. Nick Baumgartner, hailing from Iron River, competed in the 2014 Winter Olympics. He also won the gold and silver medals in the 2011 and 2012 Winter X Games, respectively. Read our Q & A with Nick here.

Baumgartner4. Just 20 years ago, many popular ski resorts, like Aspen and Toas, did now allow snowboarders on their hills. Today, you’re hard-pressed to find a resort that doesn’t welcome snowboarding with open-arms. In fact, not one of the more than 40 ski resorts in Michigan have snowboarding bans!

5. Are you regular or goofy? This may seem like an odd question to those just getting into the snowboarding sport, but to veterans, it’s like knowing their own two feet. Literally. Regular means you snowboard with your left foot forward and Goofy means you snowboard with your right foot forward. Don’t worry; it has nothing to do with your state of mind!

6. Once you’ve got your feet on the ground, you’ll need to know what kind of board to get. There are three types of snowboards: freeride, freestyle and racing. Each board is unique to the type of snowboarding you’ll be doing, so it’s important to ask what’s best for what you’ll be doing when renting or buying. Of the three types, the freeride snowboard is the most popular.

7. In 2013, 67 percent of snowboarders were males and only 33 percent were females, with boarders aged 18-24 representing more than one quarter of all shredders on the slopes.

skiing-in-michigan8. Mount Bohemia, located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, is noted as having the highest vertical (900 ft.), most snow and the most expert terrain in the Midwest. In fact, Mount Bohemia is rated #1 for powder skiing east of the Rockies by Powder Magazine and has been called one of the top ten undiscovered ski resorts in the world by MSN.com!

9. According to Livestrong.com, snowboarders make up approximately 30 percent of all business for major ski resorts in the U.S. In Michigan, many major resorts like Boyne HighlandsCaberfae and Alpine Valley invite boarders of all skill levels.

10. Snowboarding isn’t just about going down hills. Much like skateboarding, snowboarding can also be considered a trick sport. Many boarders grind off rails, jump off boxes and fly off jumps to land in the fresh powder below. If you’re going to try one of these stunts, just make sure you wear a helmet!

Interested in learning more about snowboarding or planning a trip? Visit http://www.michigan.org/snowboarding for more information!

Five Thrilling Gifts for the Adventure-Seeking Traveler on Your Shopping List

While many will be shopping for gizmos and gadgets for their loved ones this holiday season, we couldn’t forget about the adventure lovers who are always seeking their next thrill. Luckily, Michigan offers some of the most unique and adrenaline-pumping winter activities around.

This year, give the gift of adventure with these five experiences that are sure to blow the thermal socks off the thrill-seeking traveler on your shopping list.

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Dog Sledding Tours

Dog sledding is a wild winter adventure. The hot breath of the huskie pack fogs the crisp winter air as they pull you with focused determination across the glistening landscape. Imagine you’re racing against another team, over the same frozen terrain that explorers did long ago. So “mush!” and check out these exhilarating tours around the state.

Ice Climbing

Michigan is home to one of the best ice climbing regions in the country. One of winter’s newest silent sports, ice climbing combines challenge and adventure. With ropes and harness, ice climbers ascend stunning natural ice structures. Icefalls, frozen waterfalls, cliffs and rock slabs are all waiting to be conquered. Ice climbing takes you to breathtaking scenery that few people experience.

Ski and Snowboarding Packages

SkiingGet stoked! Michigan ski and snowboarding regions offer adrenaline junkies some of the most exciting, diverse terrains in the Midwest. Michigan is home to more than 40 ski areas and resorts that offer both beginners and experts a thrilling ski or boarding experience. So whether you want to catch some big air or just take a lesson, Pure Michigan is the place to look.

Ice Luge 

Luge

For those who’ve always dreamed of being an Olympian, the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex offers three separate luge tracks designed to introduce beginners to the sport of luge. Shorter in overall length than Olympic-style tracks, the Muskegon track provides an Olympic thrill with the safety of the participant in mind.  The track is designed specifically for general public use and those who never have slid before! Equipment is provided.

Winter Zip Line

Zipline3

If you thought zip lining was only for summer fun, think again. Snow Snake zip line tours consist of ten unique and exciting lines that take you through thick woods and over deep valleys at speeds reaching up to 25 mph. The longest line is more than 800 feet long and the highest is 70 feet high. The entire tour is take you more than 4,000 feet. If you know someone between the ages of 8 and 88 who is adventurous and loves being surrounded by the great outdoors, consider booking a zip line tour.

Want to discover more Pure Michigan winter fun? Head to michigan.org/winter for a complete list of activities you can enjoy this season.

 

10 Reasons to Celebrate 50 Years of Winter Fun at Boyne Highlands

Boyne Highlands will celebrate their 50th Anniversary January 31st – February 2nd with food, fresh powder and special events for the whole family. Today, guest blogger Erin Ernst from BOYNE gives us 10 reasons to celebrate 50 years of winter fun at Boyne Highlands! 

1.   Join Boyne Highlands Resort’s Anniversary Celebration Weekend, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2, for tons of live entertainment, dinner and dancing with the Up North Big Band, fireworks over the slopes and sky lantern release, and 50th Anniversary Party featuring The Sun Messengers, Detroit’s best dance band, in the Zoo Bar.

2.   Ski the highest vertical terrain and most skiable acreage in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. Boyne Highlands offers 552’ vertical feet and 435 skiable acres with trails that are over a mile long.  From the top of the slopes, there are many spectacular views, two in particular are must-sees.  From the south-west side, take in the panoramic scene of Lake Michigan’s Little Traverse Bay and on the north side, the sight of the Mackinac Bridge.

3.   Unique family adventures are abundant.  Fly high on a Zipline Adventure, enjoy the rush of a dog sled ride, slide on a tube, saunter by horseback through a winter wonderland, climb the slopes in a groomer ride, cruise along groomed trails with fat tire bikes, traverse with snowshoes, or glide over 35 km of cross country trails.

4.   Explore a part of history.  On December 26, 1963 when Boyne Highlands Resort opened, guests were greeted by not one, but two of the first triple chairlifts ever built.  In 1990, one of the triples was replaced and in its place now stands another first – Michigan’s first high-speed quad chairlift, the Heather Express.

5.   Learning a new winter sport has never been easier. Boyne Highlands SnowSports Academy has ski, snowboard, and cross country lessons for all levels and even guarantees beginner lessons or the next one is free.  Even the youngest of riders can get a jump on snowboarding with the resort’s Burton Riglet Park designed for ages 3-6.

6.   After a day on the slopes, cozy up indoors with a treatment at The Spa at Boyne Highlands, kick back by the toasty fireplace in the Slopeside Lounge, or experience the infamous après ski scene in the Zoo Bar.

7.   Sip on Boyne Highlands’ 50th Anniversary cocktail featuring Courvoisier Cognac, Cointreau, sour mix, and New Holland Freshwater Huron Rum, shaken over ice and served in a martini glass with sugar coated rim.

8.   Dine on top of a mountain with the Aonach Mor Moonlight Dinner.  The enchanting evening begins with a groomer cat sleigh ride up the slopes to the top of Boyne Highlands’ North Peak for a delicious dinner served family-style. Bubbling kettles of French onion soup, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, vegetable medley, roast beef tenderloin au poivre, and chocolate fondue, all are enjoyed while a live acoustic guitarist strums and sings favorite tunes.

9.   Loads of special events pack the calendar including the annual Brew-Ski Festival, Boarding for Breast Cancer, Krazy Daze, Chocolate Cake Downhill, and Ski League Championships, all happening in March.

10.  The home away from home experience. Boyne Highlands is well-known for offering a warm welcome and exceptional customer service.  Generations of families have made Boyne Highlands their choice for creating memories, spending time with loved ones, and returning season after season.

Erin Ernst is the Director of Communications for BOYNE, which owns and operates Boyne Highlands Resort, Boyne Mountain Resort, The Inn at Bay Harbor – A Renaissance Golf Resort, Boyne Country Sports, and Boyne Realty.  She is a Michigan native who has worked in the resort and tourism industry for over ten years.  She is also a board member with the Petoskey Area Visitors Bureau and West Michigan Tourist Association.