Fall Foliage, Football and Fun in Michigan’s Capital City

Whether you’re cheering the Spartans on to victory or paddling down the Grand River, the best way to view the beauty of autumn is to be a part of it. Lori Lanspeary from the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau shares her favorite ways to experience fall in Michigan’s capital region.

The only colors necessary for a Greater Lansing Fall Getaway are Green…and White. Whether you’re a die-hard Spartan fan who BLEEDS GREEN or a fan of some other color combination that when mixed together actually MAKES GREEN, a weekend in Michigan’s capital region should be on your bucket list before that WHITE stuff starts to fall.

It’s always a beautiful day for football when Michigan State University takes the field at Spartan Stadium. Tailgating is an East Lansing tradition as is exploring the expansive campus with the leaves crunching underfoot, visiting MSU attractions and cheering the Spartans on to victory.

Photo courtesty of the Greater Lansing CVB

Photo courtesty of the Greater Lansing CVB

We’ve got great fall leaf peeping here in mid-Michigan and you can actually get out of your car and take part in the experience. Visit our great u-pick farms such as, Uncle John’s Cider Mill in St. Johns or The Country Mill in Charlotte. Go ahead and find the best pumpkins in the patch or pick a peck of your favorite apples. And don’t forget to stop in to buy a gallon or three of the freshest apple cider, a dozen or so pumpkin donuts and a few delicious pies.

Photo courtesty of the Greater Lansing CVB

Photo courtesty of the Greater Lansing CVB

Still ready to see more color? Greater Lansing has so many different ways for you to enjoy the season. How about a River Town Adventure kayak or canoe ride along the Grand River or a beautiful trail ride at Sundance Riding Stables? It’s like seeing mid-Michigan’s majesty in a whole new way. Then hop aboard the Michigan Princess for a paddleboat ride complete with a delicious lunch, a sweet cruise on the Grand River and some pretty fall scenery. Sounds delightful, am I right? Another option may be to explore the Greater Lansing Makers & Shakers Trail and take a tasting tour of some of the small-batch, locally-sourced craft beers, spirits and wine.

Photo courtesty of the Greater Lansing CVB

Photo courtesty of the Greater Lansing CVB

Make it a Greater Lansing Fall Getaway and see your color tour in a whole new way. We promise you can return to your regular way of viewing fall color from your car seat on the way to and from Michigan’s Capital City.Lori

About the author: Lori Lanspeary is the leisure marketing manager at the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau. For over 15 years now she has been a #lovelansing advocate both personally and professionally. You can follow her weekly blogs.

Ten Things to Do at MSU (Without Having to Go to Class!)

Guest blogger Lori Lanspeary from the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau shares 10 fun things to do at Michigan State University without having to crack a book! 

Photo by Thomas Gennara Photography

Photo by Thomas Gennara Photography

Welcome to Spartan Country! Located in East Lansing, on the banks of the Red Cedar River, visitors can find a wealth of beauty and natural spaces on the sprawling campus of Michigan State University. While most people around the country know MSU by its mascot Sparty and its Big Ten sports teams, did you know that Michigan State University is currently recognized as a world leader in research? The school was founded in 1855 as the pioneer land-grant college in America and dedicated to the study of agriculture which explains the beautiful expansive campus. Today MSU has over 200 academic programs offered by 17 degree granting colleges.

BUT beyond the academics, visitors can find so many things to see and do on campus without having to sign up for a single class! Here’s the list of 10 things to do at MSU.

MSUMuseum-Dinosaur1. MSU Museum: Michigan’s first Smithsonian-affiliate, this museum is filled to the brim with research artifacts and natural wonders from around the world. And both the kids and adults love the dinosaurs!

2. W. J. Beal Botanical Gardens: The oldest continuously-operated garden of its type in the U.S. with over 2,700 species organized in economic, systematic landscape and ecological groupings. And the MSU Horticulture Gardens – A family of three adjoining gardens including research gardens, landscape arboretum and the delightful 4-H Children’s Garden.

3. Abrams Planetarium: Sit back and enjoy the wonders of the universe in the sky theatre.

MSU blog Pure Michigan4. Beaumont Tower: This is the iconic bell tower where carillonneurs play noontime recitals and legends tell of first kisses at midnight and engagements in the shadow of the tower.

5. MSU Farms: Colts racing, beef calves frolicking and mooing dairy cows waiting to be milked are a few of the sights to see when visiting the farms.

6. Wharton Center for Performing Arts: Catch the latest major touring Broadway blockbusters plus a great lineup of performing arts at Wharton.

7. MSU Dairy Store: It’s always hard to choose betwen the 32 flavors of some of the freshest ice cream you’ll ever taste. Or pick up some award-winning cheese varieties. Smiles guaranteed!

SONY DSC8. Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum: This Zaha Hadid-designed art museum presents groundbreaking, international contemporary art across all media and is housed in a pleated stainless steel and glass multi-angled building that in itself is an architectural wonder.

9. Demmer Shooting Sports Education & Training Center: This training site for Michigan State University archery, rifle and pistol club teams is open to the public and promotes the safe use of firearms and archery equipment.

10. Big Ten Sporting Events:  Spartan football, basketball and hockey are among the favorite reasons for a visit to MSU. The resounding chants of Go Green! Go White! echo across campus. Make time for one last stop. Your visit won’t be complete without a photo taken in front of the bronze Spartan Statue near the stadium.

Have you visited East Lansing? What else would you add to the list? 

image001Need help planning your trip? Contact the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau or while visiting Michigan State University, stop by our East Lansing Visitor Center at 549 East Grand River Avenue located directly across from the Eli & Edythe Broad Art Museum.  Find maps, brochures and Visitor Guides or speak directly to one of our friendly information specialists happy to assist you during your visit.

Stocking Steelhead in the Red Cedar River (Part 2)

Last week, Elyse Walter of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources gave us a preview of what was in store for Michigan anglers in the East Lansing area in Part 1 of her post. Today, Elyse fills us in on details of the April 15th event where 3,000 steelhead were stocked in the Red Cedar River at Michigan State University.

On Monday, April 15, nearly 3,000 steelhead (a variety of rainbow trout raised in captivity) were stocked in the Red Cedar River on Michigan State University’s campus. This activity marked an ordinance change by the MSU Board of Trustees this past December that now allows fishing on campus for the first time since the 1960s.

Because of this ordinance change, hook-and-line fishing is now allowed on the north bank of the Red Cedar River between the western edge of Brody Complex and the Sparty bridge. Previously the river was off limits for more than 50 years due to the entire campus of MSU being considered a preserve and therefore, hunting, fishing and gathering were off limits.

The steelhead stocking was conducted in an effort to enhance future angling opportunities on the Red Cedar. Numerous dignitaries were on hand to assist in the effort by dumping buckets of the six- to eight-inch-long steelhead fish directly into the river.

These dignitaries included: Sparty, MSU Trustee Dianne Byrum, MSU Acting Provost June Youatt, DNR Commissioner Tim Nichols, DNR Director Keith Creagh, Michigan Trout Unlimited’s Bryan Burroughs, Michigan United Conservation Clubs’ Amy Trotter, former DNR directors Howard Tanner and Gordon Guyer, and various MSU students and faculty.

Monday’s stocking occurred at the bridge located off the southeast corner of the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center’s parking ramp. The 3,000 steelhead that were released were part of the nearly 19 million fish the DNR will stock throughout the state this spring. The DNR uses stocking to restore, enhance and create new fishing opportunities in Michigan’s inland lakes, streams and the Great Lakes.

The steelhead recently put into the Red Cedar will now make their way to Lake Michigan and potentially return to the river to spawn in one to three years.

For interested anglers, fishing the Red Cedar River’s designated area will now be allowed during a three-year test period. Please note a fishing license is required to fish the Red Cedar River. If anglers plan to target trout and/or salmon they will need to purchase an All-Species license.  

GO GREEN and pay MSU’s Red Cedar River a visit the next time you’re in town – you never know what you might catch!  

Learn more about fishing opportunities around the state at michigan.org.

Elyse Walter is a communication specialist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. She specifically works with the DNR’s Fisheries Division to help educate and promote the state’s fishing opportunities and aquatic resources.