Six Scenic Drives for Pure Michigan Summer Road Trips

As school and work schedules slow down and temperatures heat up, summer is the perfect time for a road trip in Pure Michigan! Nick Nerbonne of The Awesome Mitten has rounded up a list of some great road trips around the state.

Summer is meant for road trips with the windows down, music up, and good times on the horizon. Fortunately for Michiganders, and for those who visit us here in the Mitten, there are plenty of options for beautiful drives that showcase the beauty of the Great Lakes State.

I’ve had the pleasure of exploring quite a bit of Michigan’s pleasant peninsulas, and when I hop in the car and hit the road from my home in Traverse City, I often find myself heading toward the miles of Great Lakes coastline that are always just a  short drive away, no matter where you are in the state. Here are a few of my favorites:

1. Red Arrow Highway from New Buffalo to St. Joseph

Head north from New Buffalo on Red Arrow Highway along Lake Michigan to explore the quaint coastal villages of Union Pier, Lakeside and Harbert on your way to St. Joseph. Known for its art galleries and antiques, this popular summer cruise also features numerous Lake Michigan beaches.

The region’s climate is heavily influenced by Lake Michigan, and orchards and vineyards checker the landscape. Sample wines at tasting rooms for over a dozen wineries along the Lake Michigan Shore Wine Trail, and bring a few bottles home to open while sharing the memories.

Don’t miss: Weko Beach

Follow the signs from Red Arrow Highway in Bridgman to this beautiful stretch of Lake Michigan beach. Day passes are available, or reserve a campsite and catch one of Weko Beach’s famous sunsets.

2. M-22 from Arcadia to Frankfort

M-22 receives much of its well-deserved notoriety for the many scenic destinations along its northern reaches in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. While these are among my favorite day trips in Michigan, I often look further south along this scenic coastal highway, beginning in the village of Arcadia.

On a hot summer day, the beach at Arcadia is the perfect place for a refreshing swim along the sandy shore. After cooling off in the “Big Lake,” head north along M-22 for scenic vistas from the tops of the wooded hills to the Lake Michigan port city of Frankfort. Grab a Michigan craft beer at newly-opened Stormcloud Brewing Company and stroll along Frankfort’s pier to the very photogenic lighthouse.

Don’t miss: Lake Michigan overlook just north of Arcadia

Head north along M-22 from Arcadia and stop at the scenic turnout just outside of town. Climb the steps for a spectacular view from atop the bluff.

3. M-23 from Tawas City to Alpena

Often overlooked by travelers heading north, Michigan’s “Sunrise Coast” offers a Great Lakes setting with a beauty all its own. From M-55 in Tawas City, M-23 skirts the Lake Huron shoreline through the coastal villages of Oscoda and Harrisville on its way north to Alpena. Pack a picnic and enjoy the scenery at Alpena’s waterfront park adjacent to the marina on the shores of Thunder Bay.

Harrisville State Park offers campsites directly on Lake Huron. Make your reservation early to get the best view of the beach.

Don’t miss: Sturgeon Point Lighthouse

Constructed in 1870, this classic Lake Huron beacon is a must-stop when traveling along M-23.

4. River Road Scenic Byway

The River Road Scenic Byway leads visitors west along the AuSable River from Oscoda. The drive lives up to its name, with several viewpoints high above the AuSable Valley along the way, but also provides a glimpse into the area’s past as a major hub in Michigan’s timber industry. Hiking trails and elaborate staircases provide access to the water’s edge, so bring your hiking shoes.

Don’t Miss: Lumberman’s Monument

Dedicated in 1932, Lumberman’s Monument recognizes the hard-working lumbermen of Michigan’s early logging industry. Follow the trail northeast from the

Lumberman’s Monument Visitor Center for a panoramic view of the AuSable River and surrounding area.

5. US-2 from St. Ignace to Manistique

A trip across the “Mighty Mac” always involves breathtaking scenery, and the drive west from St. Ignace on U.S. 2 doesn’t disappoint. After passing the famed Mystery Spot just outside of town, the highway re-joins the Lake Michigan shoreline for several miles. Locals and visitors alike stop along the way for picnics among the dunes and swimming in the Lake Michigan surf.

Any visit to “The Yoop” would not be complete without an authentic Upper Peninsula pasty. Hiawatha Pasties in Naubinway, about 45 minutes west of St. Ignace, is a favorite of locals and visitors alike.

Don’t miss: Cut River Bridge Overlook

Park at the scenic turnout about 25 miles west of St. Ignace for a view of Lake Michigan and the Cut River 150 feet below; a trail and staircase lead to the valley floor for those looking for a mid-drive adventure.

6. M-134 from Hessel to Drummond Island

Head east on M-134 from I-75 north of St. Ignace for views of Lake Huron and the Les Cheneaux Islands that go undiscovered by many. The classic boathouses of the early-1900s cottages and rocky shorelines of Les Cheneaux’s 36 islands are seen by many as reminiscent of east-coast hideaways found along the coast of Maine. If you’re lucky enough to make the drive early in the morning, keep your camera ready for a photo of a sailboat moored among the morning mist in one of the many natural harbors.

Don’t miss: Antique Wooden Boat Show in Hessel

Held each August in the Les Cheneaux Islands, the Antique Wooden Boat show is one of the largest gatherings in the country of classic vessels dating back to the early 1900s.

Nick Nerbonne is an online marketing specialist, outdoor adventurer, craft beer drinker, wine enthusiast, and aspiring photographer from Traverse City. 

Pure Michigan Fourth of July 2013 Events Roundup

Across Michigan, fireworks events have already started happening and people will be out and about celebrating the Fourth of July from now through next Thursday! With so many fun events happening across the state, there is still time to plan a great Independence Day adventure. Below is just a sampling of celebrations.

For a complete listing of events in Michigan visit www.michigan.org.

Fourth of July Celebration | Clawson
June 24-July 4, 2013, Clawson
In Clawson the celebration starts June 24. Events include an ice cream social, live music, parade, games and 5K run. The carnival midway opens on July 3 and on July 4 enjoy a pancake breakfast, arts and crafts event, fire department water battle, more entertainment and fireworks.

4th of July Celebration & Fireworks
July 4, 2013, St. Ignace
Combining the nostalgic sentiment of a small-town celebration with the picturesque backdrop of Lake Huron and Mackinac Island makes the 4th of July in St. Ignace something special. Watch the parade at 1 p.m., enjoy kid’s games and a community picnic at 2 p.m., and watch the fireworks over Moran Bay at dusk. Let us show you patriotism, St. Ignace style! For more information, call (888) 878-4462.

Grand Rapids 4th of July Fireworks
July 4, 2013, Grand Rapids
The Amway 4th of July Family Fireworks event is an annual favorite of upwards of 150,000 who come to downtown Grand Rapids to listen to great entertainment and enjoy a fireworks spectacular. The tradition continues on the lawn in front of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. Patriotic music, dance and presentations mixed with great entertainment from local and national artists from 6 p.m. until the fireworks start. Fireworks will begin at 10:30. Visit the website for more information.

Fourth of July Celebration
July 4, 2013, Marshall
Celebrate Independence Day in Marshall! Festivities begin with the ‘Celebrate America’ parade at 10 a.m. Then, witness the annual flag rising, listen to the patriotic sounds of the Marshall Community Post Band and enjoy a traditional chicken dinner; it’s a true Independence Day celebration!

Frankfort’s Fourth of July Celebration
July 4, 2013, Elberta
Frankfort’s Annual 4th of July celebration includes: a parade, carnival, art in the park craft fair, sand sculpture contest on the Lake Michigan Beach,  BBQ and fireworks on Frankfort Beach at dusk (Approximately 10:30pm)! For more information, visit the website or call (231) 352-7251.

Traverse City 4th of July Fireworks
July 4, 2013, Traverse City
Enjoy a spectacular 4th of July fireworks display beginning at dark with great viewing from anywhere along the West Bay shoreline in Traverse City. Fireworks are expected to go from 10 p.m.  – 11 p.m.

Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks
July 4, 2013, Grand Haven
The annual Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks display lights up the night sky after the evening’s showing of the Grand Haven Musical Fountain. For more information call (616) 842-4499.

Fourth of July Celebration
July 4-6, 2013, Cedarville
Enjoy the spectacular view of fireworks over Cedarville Bay from Cedarville’s downtown waterfront park or the lawn of the Great Lakes Boat Building School on July 4. Come earlier in the day for the parade, kids games, hot dogs and burgers, Up in Smoke BBQ, races and contests and more. Wind down into early evening with music on the bay by Dance Commander DJ and a Jersey Mud eating contest. For more information, call (906) 484-3935.

Fourth of July – Harbor Springs
July 4, 2013, Harbor Springs
Events include a juried art fair, 3-mile and 10-mile run, parade, live music and fireworks. For event information, contact the Chamber at (231) 526-7999. See you on the Fourth and be sure to wear your red, white and blue!

Cadillac Independence Day Celebration

July 4-7, 2013, Cadillac
The event kicks off in the City Park with live evening entertainment. There will be the 2nd Annual Fire on Water (a tribute to our military past, present and future), and a full day of events including the Thunder on the LakeShore Motorcycle Show, Wrestling Extravaganza, children’s bounce houses, food & merchandise vendors, dunk tank, hot air balloon rides, community photo, ‘better than a water park’ event and an evening finale with the fireworks. For more information, visit the website or call (231) 775-0657.

How will you will be spending the 4th of July? Share with us below! For hundreds of more events and festivals happening around the state this month, visit michigan.org

How Did Michigan Cities Get Their Names? Part 12

In our ongoing series of how cities in Michigan got their names, we’ve been able to share with you the history of cities from around our state. In case you missed them, here are Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8 , Part 9, Part 10 and Part 11.

Today, we share the stories of how five more Michigan cities were named in part 12.

Hillsdale
The village of Hillsdale was incorporated in 1847 and became a city in 1869. The geographical make-up of the Hillsdale area, which consists of hills and dales, influenced the name “Hillsdale”. Though Hillsdale does not have any mountain to create dales, or valleys, it has heights that reach up to 1,250 feet above sea level, allowing dales to exist.

Fowlerville
Handy Township, the township in which Fowlerville is located, was surveyed by Sylvestor Sibley in 1825. Calvin Handy and his family were the first settlers to arrive in Handy Township on June 16, 1836.  Later that year, Ralph Fowler from Livingston County, New York, moved to the northeast portion of Handy Township. Considered to be the first permanent resident of this area of Handy Township, the area was named Fowlerville.  The village incorporated in 1871.

Reed City
Before its establishment, Reed City was first known as Tunshla and then Todd’s Slashing.  It was plotted in 1870 by Charles Higbe, Ozias Slosson, and Fredrick Todd who re-named the village Reed City, after J.M. Reed. While the land was named after Reed, the streets and avenues were named after the village’s other incorporators.   

Monroe
Monroe was first named Frenchtown in 1784.  It was the third European settlement in the state of Michigan.  In 1817, President James Monroe visited Frenchtown, causing the location to be renamed after the president in his honor.  The newly named Monroe was then re-incorporated as a city in 1837. 

St. Ignace
St. Ignace’s name is derived from the Roman Catholic missionaries who settled the area during the time of the French and British explorers and fur traders.  The Jesuit missionaries christened the community in honor of the founder of the Society of Jesus, St. Ignatius Loyola, and named the city in his honor. Among these Jesuits priests were Fathers Marquette, Charlevoix, and Allouez, whose names may sound of other familiar Michigan cities.

   

Which cities would you like to see featured next? Share with us below!