Eight Reasons to Love Ypsilanti

Ypsilanti – generally referred to as “Ypsi” by the locals – is a progressive city just four miles east of Ann Arbor. The city is rich in history and thrives with a creative community. Surely, there are more than 8 reasons to love Ypsilanti, but this list from Visit Ypsi will get you started!

1. The Events

Events are a large part of Ypsilanti’s culture and keep visitors coming back for more – from weekly cruise nights and farmers markets, to art shows and air shows. Ypsilanti is home to major annual events such as, Michigan ElvisFest, Michigan Brewers Guild Summer Beer Festival, The Color Run Michigan Eastside, and the Thunder Over Michigan Air Show. These events attract thousands of visitors and are just a few of the events that help make Ypsi unique and thriving. Click here for a list of the city’s major events.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

2. The Food

Adventurous diners and comfort-food connoisseurs will have their cravings satisfied in Ypsilanti. Fresh salads, cultural fusions, classic barbecue, and ample amounts of mac and cheese can be found on menus in the charming city. The city has a passion for mastering the burger, crafting local beers, and creating artisanal coffee beverages. But the best part is that every dining hotspot is 100% authentic, local, and served with a smile.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

3. The Parks

Ypsi parks offer the perfect setting for afternoon strolls, concerts, ballgames, and more. Riverside Park hosts the majority of the city’s outdoor events and runs along the historic Huron River. Just across the “tridge” is Frog Island where you can find a gorgeous/unique amphitheater and a spacious soccer field. Ypsi has endless parks tucked away as you wander through the city and contributes to the 400 square miles of parks in Southeast Michigan (also known as The Big 400).

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

4. The People

Many people who choose to live in Ypsi are attracted to its sense of community, but the hometown-feel is not exclusive to locals. “Ypsilantians” care about their city and are passionate about sharing it with others. The affordable housing has drawn in a creative community – which is why you will find art galleries inside third-wave coffee houses, or a rustic beer pub inside a renovated historic warehouse. Visiting Ypsi is as good as making time for your creative side. The spirit of the community, made by the people, will align your mind with inspiration.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

5. The University

Eastern Michigan University’s campus is a beautiful gem in Ypsi. Historic and modern architecture create a unique juxtaposition for students and visitors. An active student body hosts many research symposiums, athletic events, and art happenings. You can find affordable and unique dining experiences close to campus (and for an insider tip: campus is a great place for a breezy walk or bike ride). Go Eagles!

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

6. The Shopping

Bring an extra suitcase when you Visit Ypsilanti! You are sure to be packed with antiques, novelties, and artisan gifts by the time you make your way home. The rare antique shopping is a regional attraction and quirky storefronts are full of must-have knick-knacks.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

7. The History

Many people want to know about the origin of the tongue-twisting name, Ypsilanti, but that’s only one of many fascinating stories that can be told about the individualistic city. (It’s pronounced ip-suh-lan-tee, by the way, and you can learn more about the name by clicking here).

Early settlements of Native American tribes along the Huron River is where the story begins. In later years, Ypsilanti played a major role in WWII at the Willow Run Bomber Plant (home to many real life Rosie-the-Riveters), and also laid claim to the last Hudson Dealership.

Ypsi has four local museums dedicated to preserving and sharing stories throughout the centuries. However, simply walking through the streets will take you back in time – historic architecture lines the city’s sidewalks, and heritage events take place throughout the year.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

8. The Neighbors

Ypsilanti is surrounded by seven outstanding communities – each with their own unique events, shopping, dining, and outdoor activities. Nationally acclaimed theatres, fun-in-the-sun waterparks, and art and music festivals should be added to your Ypsi itinerary. All of these adventures and more can be easily accessed by major highways (with a complimentary scenic drive) just minutes away from Downtown Ypsi!

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Honorable Mention: The Water Tower

A blog like this wouldn’t be complete without mention of Ypsilanti’s historic water tower. Built in 1890, Ypsi’s water tower stands 147 feet tall in the middle of the city.

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

Photo courtesy of Visit Ypsi

There is so much more to discover in Ypsilanti. Click here to start your journey, or follow this blog for regular updates about the unique Pure Michigan city!

What do you love about Ypsilanti? 

How Did Michigan Cities Get Their Names? Part 7

In our ongoing series of how cities in Michigan got their names, we’ve been able to share with you the history of cities from around our state. In case you missed them, here are Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5 and Part 6. This week, check out part seven, which shares the stories of how five more Michigan cities were named.

Holland
As you might have guessed, Holland was settled by Dutch immigrants. They were looking to escape social, cultural and economic troubles in Europe in the 1840’s. The settlement established by them was known as the “Holland Kolonie.” It was formally founded in 1847.

Pigeon
Started as a railroad town in 1883, Pigeon was originally called Berne Junction. However, the new community began calling it Pigeon due to the nearby Pigeon River. The river was named for the huge flocks of passenger pigeons that lived near the river. It’s said the flocks were so thick that, when flying, they blacked out the sky. Despite this though, the passenger pigeon was named extinct by 1914.

Ypsilanti
Like Pigeon, Ypsilanti wasn’t always known by the name is has today. The city was originally a trading post set up in 1809 and called Woodruff’s Grove after Major Thomas Woodruff. The name was later changed to Ypsilanti in 1829 in honor of Demetrius Ypsilanti. Ypsilanti was a hero in the Greek War of Independence from the Ottoman Empire.

Munising
Munising is a Native American name meaning “Place of the Great Island.” In 1820 the Chippewa village was located at the mouth of the Anna River, but they later moved camp to Sand Point. Munising was actually officially founded in 1850, but the first civilization was built in Au Train. The town consisted of thirty homes, one blacksmith shop, the bay furnace, a sawmill and a government lighthouse.

Gaylord
Gaylord’s namesake comes from Augustine Smith Gaylord. It was established in 1872 and named Barnes, but it was changed a year later to honor Gaylord, who was an attorney for the Jackson, Lansing, Saginaw railroad. Still, if you were to ask someone why the name was changed just a year later to Gaylord, no one could tell you as the reason for doing so has been lost!

Link Roundup – March 31, 2011

Photo Credit: Botanical Designs & Landscaping Inc.

Another week has passed, and we are back with the weekly Link Roundup! Once again, we’ve pulled together a collection of Michigan events and stories submitted by our fans on Facebook and Twitter, along with some that we found on our own. The photo chosen this week was submitted to our Facebook page with the caption, “I can’t wait for the weather to break.” We think that everyone is feeling that excitement, and the picture gives us a glimpse of what is right around the corner.

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